Coffee Break - Doug Dascenzo

EP 27: Compassion in Action: Creating a Caring Work Environment

Summary: 

It’s vital to understand rather than dictate emotions, fostering unity amidst adversity.

In this episode, Doug Dascenzo, Regional Chief Nursing Officer of Trinity Health, delves into the crucial aspects of fostering a compassionate and collaborative work culture within healthcare organizations. Doug emphasizes the importance of understanding and supporting each other’s emotions, advocating for open communication, empathy, and frequent check-ins to build trust and address concerns effectively. Additionally, he stresses the significance of recognizing diverse personalities within teams, fostering socialization, and establishing common ground to address workplace violence. Doug and Renee encourage listeners to prioritize compassion, collaboration, and safety measures to foster a healthier and more supportive work environment in healthcare, highlighting education and interprofessional collaboration as essential tools for addressing these challenges.

Tune in and learn how to contribute to building a more compassionate and secure healthcare system for all!

About Doug Dascenzo:

Doug Dascenzo is an experienced healthcare executive energized by innovation, creativity, diversity, and inclusion. His work has revolved largely around the experience of care for both patients and clinicians utilizing evidence, Caritas, implementation science, interprofessional teamwork, and professional governance to realize improvements. 

Doug is the Regional Chief Nursing Officer at Trinity Health – Michigan and the Chief Nursing Officer at Trinity Health Oakland. He has served in this capacity over the past 7 years. He has earned a Bachelor of Science in Nursing at Wayne State University (1984), a Master of Science in Nursing at Madonna University (2000), and a Doctor of Nursing Practice at the University of Detroit Mercy (2021). Additionally, he holds a Certification in Executive Nursing Practice from the American Organization of Nursing Leadership. 

Doug is the past President of the Michigan Organization of Nursing Leadership and Sigma Kappa Iota. He is on the Board of the Michigan Organization of Nurse Leaders, Michigan State University Master’s in Healthcare Management, Oakland University School of Nursing, and the American Association for Men in Nursing. He serves as affiliate faculty at the University of Detroit Mercy and adjunct faculty at Madonna University. He is also an active member of the editorial board of the Online Journal of Issues in Nursing. Doug has been recently mentioned in Becker’s Hospital Review as one of 153 hospital and health system chief nursing officers to know.

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Renee Thompson:
Plants thrive and grow in a peaceful, nourished environment, right? Well, it's the same with human beings. But what if that environment is not so peaceful? What if it's toxic? Welcome to Coffee Break: Breaking the Cycle of Bullying in Healthcare – One Cup at a Time. In this podcast, you'll get practical, evidence-based strategies to help you cultivate and sustain a healthy and respectful work culture by tackling an age-old problem in healthcare: bullying and incivility. I am your host, Doctor Renee Thompson.

Renee Thompson:
Hi everyone! Welcome back to another episode of the Coffee Break podcast. Wherever you are watching or listening, I hope you're in a good place. I hope you are making progress in your organization or your department. I'm really trying to cultivate a healthy, respectful, kinder work culture. And I read this the other day. It was really profound to me. It said, A leader's most important job is to shepherd the culture of the organization or department that they lead. And today we're going to talk to someone who's a nurse executive who does this so well. Today, I'm welcoming Doctor Doug Dascenzo, the Regional CNO at Trinity Health Michigan and Trinity Health Oakland. Doug, welcome to the show.

Doug Dascenzo:
Thank you, Renee. Good to be here.

Renee Thompson:
Oh, my goodness. I have been looking forward to this conversation because, as I said, Doug is one of those people that instantly, he is all about making sure that operations are running smoothly and that he's got the right people in his organization and everybody's doing the right thing. But he also understands the importance of culture, and how to make sure we really reinforce compassion and all these other things that we know are so equally as important, both the left and the right brain, and Doug does that so well. Couple of really interesting things about Doug. Doug has developed a prototype for virtually connected care across Trinity Health, looking at how we can utilize virtual nurses and virtual care into healthcare, into the workforce. He also is actively advocating to the Michigan Legislature on proposed legislation affecting the healthcare of our communities and being of nurses, and Doug is also immersed in the academic practice partnerships across the state, and he's sharing lessons learned. And this is something I like to share. Doug and I have known each other for years, and I first met Doug when I was living in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and I was the director of Academic Service Partnerships. And Doug had spent, I don't know how many years you were with us at UPMC, Doug, but you were the Chief Nursing Officer at one of our hospitals. And that's how Doug and I came to know each other, and it was a great day when I got to meet Doug.

Doug Dascenzo:
It was a great day for me as well.

Renee Thompson:
Yeah. And that was, how long ago was that?

Doug Dascenzo:
That was in 2007 when I started, and I was at UPMC for a couple of years before South Side Hospital, where I work, had merged with Mercy.

Renee Thompson:
That's right. It was South Side Hospital, and my role with Academic Service Partnerships, we would meet with all the Chief Nursing Officers and the deans and directors of the schools of nursing. And so I remember that, Doug, you were an advocate for that partnership back in the day when that was actually a newer concept. And, Doug, I want to start the conversation with you really taking a look at compassion. And this is, I know, a primary focus that you have is making sure that, we make sure it's not that we bring back compassion, but that we make sure compassion is always a focus. And I have to ask, though, isn't it sort of a prerequisite that you're compassionate if you want to work in healthcare? So can you talk to us a little bit about this?

Doug Dascenzo:
I would certainly like to think it was a prerequisite. However, based on what I'm reading in the literature, I think patients or those that we serve have a different experience, leading me to believe that we have a compassion crisis where burnout is very prevalent, and we begin to deep the work that we do and forget that there's actually science behind the necessity to utilize compassion in care, clinical outcomes, social outcomes, those all improve, as well as the attitude among those of us who are willing to exercise compassion in our care. So I've been struck by that and recognize what little education, what little time it actually takes in order to set the patient up for success.

Renee Thompson:
And it's interesting because for many, many years, doing this work related to bullying, and incivility, workplace violence, I have often said, Nurses can be so compassionate to their patients, but so cruel to each other. I think, though, what we're seeing is they're not as compassionate to their patients. And I don't know from your perspective, Doug, and I certainly don't want to blame the pandemic on everything, but have you seen, you mentioned the compassion crisis? Do you see that the pandemic played a role in this? And now we're in a situation where we have a lot of burnout, that it's affecting the compassion that we would normally show to our patients and their family members.

Doug Dascenzo:
Yes, I would agree that the pandemic played a role. And I think sometimes, too, in the aftermath of the pandemic, we have created a self-fulfilling prophecy. We start to tell people how they should feel and how they should work. And if you don't fit into that box, you think something might be wrong with you. I do think that it's been aggravated by that. And also the politics in our country where divisiveness is more prevalent, perhaps more in-your-face than it was in the past.

Renee Thompson:
Yes, I've seen that too. It's almost now it's accepted that we're so divided that is okay; it's the norm. I want to circle back on something that you said about, we really shouldn't be telling people how they should feel, and this actually comes up a lot. I had, I was working with a leader who told me he was meeting with a group of his educators, so this was a clinical manager of a department. He was meeting with his educators, and the educators basically said, We don't feel valued by everybody. And he said, No, you shouldn't feel that way. You shouldn't feel, you shouldn't feel that we don't value you. We do value you. And then he went on to defend, a lot of us do that, defend: You are absolutely valued. And when I talk with him, what I said is, Instead of going, you know, telling them you shouldn't feel that way because to your point, Doug, you cannot tell somebody how they should feel. But rather, what I said to him was, is to just get curious and say, Oh my, tell me, what makes you say that? Because then that opens the door to a conversation. And so have you been in situations where your caregivers, your nurses, your texture support, your physicians, your providers are in situations where they're being told how they should feel? And how are you maybe opening up the door to having a conversation about something like compassion so that we can actually, and you said there's a lot of science behind this, that we can actually take a look at it objectively so that we can then provide better compassionate care to the patients, but also be compassionate towards ourselves, which I think is lacking.

Doug Dascenzo:
I would agree, I think that what is key is to create the venue for listening and listening very carefully. One of the things that we tend to do now as we shepherd change in our organization, is we do frequent check-ins with those affected by and also driving the change. Even drivers are going to be affected by the changes that they shepherd. We collect data, and then we present it to them and we tell them this is what we're seeing. Is this how you're feeling, where the questions clear to you? Because sometimes we have to change the way we ask the question in order to really get the data that we're seeking. And we find that as long as we're consistent in our approach that people begin to trust and they begin to open up. We have to walk our talk enough times for people to believe that we mean what we say as leaders.

Renee Thompson:
So incredibly important. And somebody said to me, because I had mentioned you need to be the role model, and he actually countered that a little bit by saying, You need to model the behaviors that you want to see in other people. So it's a little bit different than, Be the role model. But no, you need to model the behaviors. I look at it as it's more active, like I'm going to model the behaviors that I want to see in other people. And you're absolutely right, especially if you're listening to this and you're in a leadership role, your people are going to be watching you like a hawk. You can't talk about extending compassion, just something compassion if you're not demonstrating compassion yourself. And I'm interested to know when you're creating a venue for listening and you're doing these frequent check-ins, how are you doing that? Is it a town hall? Is it during rounding? So can you give us some of your tactics on how you do this?

Doug Dascenzo:
I round daily, and I solicit feedback daily. I might choose what it is I want people to focus on. It's generally around a recent change and how I expect people might be affected by them. So I do my pulse check to see how close I am to what I believe to be so. And I also believe that by showing up daily, you tend to break through some of the stereotype. One of the things that I learned, the privilege of being a senior leader, as you alluded to, is that people are watching me, and I think I heard from one of our DEI content experts that maybe 40% of the organization tend to gravitate toward what they see in their senior leader. That's a pretty astounding statistic, and certainly reinforces the privilege and the honor of leading at that level, and the responsibility that we have to our teams to show up in the right way.

Renee Thompson:
And when you think about this, it's a heavy burden to be that person who is really influencing the people in your organization by what you do. And there's got to be times where you're just having a rough day. I don't want to be the role model today because I'm having a bad day. And I think there is an element of actually telling people, like being vulnerable, I am not a perfect leader. I am not a perfect human being. I am working on this too. I am having a rough day today. But I think leaders get caught in a trap, especially in executive senior leader. You get caught in the trap that you think you have to be perfect. And know humanness, know them, the messiness of being a human, and instead just be authentic. You have to. There's a fine line between being authentic and being modeling the behavior that you want to see in other people. Yeah, I'm really interested in your perspective on that.

Doug Dascenzo:
I think COVID, though, it was a curse, it was also a blessing because it was the great equalizer. All of us as caregivers were in the same place. None of us had answers. All of us were afraid. But we came together as a unified team and committed to working through it together. And I think we saw each other's vulnerability. As a leader, what I saw in those closest to the patient was the innovation and creativity that those closest to the patient actually possessed, and were able to suggest solutions to problems that, to be honest, I'm not sure I would have arrived in the same place, but they took us to a better place. And because we learned to trust each other, we knew how to support what they were suggesting that we would do.

Renee Thompson:
That's pretty remarkable. And I've heard a lot of stories from other leaders and their teams about: it was the equalizer. It didn't matter what role you had. You were in the burning building together and you had to work together as a team, actually accomplish, you know, what we needed to accomplish in healthcare. And that brings up another area that I'd like to talk to you about, and that is looking at the interprofessional team and collaboration. This is such a big-ticket item right now, and it is also for us at the Healthy Workforce Institute. I wrote an article recently about how to break the silos in healthcare because they are still there, they are still there. And actually, I'll have a link to that in the show notes when this airs. But can you talk a little bit about how you're doing that in your organization to make sure that you're actually coming together as an interprofessional team?

Doug Dascenzo:
Very deliberately, we're identifying groups that have raised concerns about difficulty of working together, identifying common purpose, and making all the oars move in the right direction. So we've actually brought groups together with some intention, for instance. We have a rapid response team that's comprised of nurses and physicians, and we learned from them at one point in time that they were having difficulty remaining on the same page. There seemed to be some power struggles between them. So we brought them together. One, they had to get to know each other at a social level, because they hadn't even taken the time to learn each other's names or backgrounds. Some didn't even know whether they were from this country or another country because they never took the time to learn. And then we started to identify the purpose of the Rapid Response Team. And in hearing some of the perspectives of what was going well and what wasn't, together we arrived at what we thought was a pretty good solution, where there would be a debriefing twice daily among the players on the team, so that they have the opportunity themselves to identify what went well that day and where they might improve, and then, in so doing, they also got to know each other better. And we know we saw the evidence of this when the same residents were graduating from their residency program, and these nurses brought bouquets of roses to them.

Renee Thompson:
Wow.

Doug Dascenzo:
It seemed to work. And now, more recently, we're focusing on the residents that are working in critical care and the nurses that support patients in that space, hoping to achieve something similar where they feel more like partners and care rather than adversaries.

Renee Thompson:
We see this a lot, and we have this hierarchy in healthcare, but yet we say, We're all on the same team, but then we don't see evidence of that. And this has been coming up a lot with the work that we do here at the Healthy Workforce Institute. We'll be working with a department and everybody on the team nurses, providers, physicians, the techs, everyone. And what we find is that the nurses and providers and physicians, they never meet together. Physicians and providers, they have their meeting; nurses have their meeting. And I ask, Do you ever meet together? And the answer is no. And something that we're working on with our clients is that we bring a few physicians, providers together, if they have providers, and a few nursing leaders together, and we say, Okay, here's the goal. First of all, you have to find space where you're together. And it could be you invite each other to your meetings, even if it's for 15 minutes, flying space, so that you can be together. And your goals are, and it's exactly to your point, Doug: number one, relationship building. It is harder, and forgive the simplicity of this, it's harder to be mean to someone if you know them. It's harder to be abrasive and get testy with someone if you know who they are as a human being, beyond the work environment. And then it's collaborative problem-solving, and that's exactly what you just described, is they came together and as an interprofessional team, and adding those debriefings now allows them to immediately do any of that. Okay, what went well? What didn't go? What do we want to do differently the next time? That's collaborative problem-solving. And the fact they gave them roses, that's evidence of relationship building that they got to know them as a human. So incredibly powerful. But how do you then spread that across your organization so it's not in pockets?

Doug Dascenzo:
So we've suggested to units, these microsystems, that they create an opportunity for socializing where they're working so the physicians and the nurse practitioners and physician assistants can all come together, common purpose, just to get to know one another and then also to become more comfortable speaking to each other face to face. One of these factors that though very efficient, but got in the way of relationship building, is texting. So many misinterpretations of intention. You know, those that send texts think they've been very clear about the problem and what they need and what they expect, and the recipients are still scratching their head trying to figure out, Who sent this to me in the first place? And how important is this for me to act right now? Who is this? Yeah, so that's our approach now, is at the microsystem level, we're encouraging some socialization. The resident physicians, for the most part, are our lifeblood in the organization. They're really doing a lot of the work, directing the rest of the team. And what we're learning as we're getting to know them better is they're not always comfortable in that role, and then become more comfortable showing their vulnerable side, right, asking for input from other members of the team and then feeling better about the work that they've done together.

Renee Thompson:
I've seen this a lot where, I interviewed doctor Rishi Garg from Inova Fairfax. We were talking about a healthy work culture and communicating, … was a member of the interprofessional team, and conflict resolution, and all of those really important, people call them soft skills, we call them essential skills. And he even said, We don't learn this in med school. We don't talk about this. So you look at the people who are on your team, and some of them actually understand how to show up and be vulnerable and engage somebody in a collegial conversation and do the collaborative problem-solving. But other people, they haven't learned that skill yet, and it sounds like you're providing space for them to work on that.

Doug Dascenzo:
That is correct. We are doing that. One of our educators also decided to revisit something that was old and seems new again, and that is discovering elements of people's personalities and wearing symbols on their badges that kind of tell others their major versus minor traits, so that as you see someone who's different from you, you may learn how to interact with them a little bit differently than perhaps if you knew nothing about them at all.

Renee Thompson:
Wow. Now I like that: what's old is new again. But I think also just to recognize that we're not all the same, but we all want, it's establishing common ground first. And you mentioned something related to that: We're all here for the same reason. We want to make sure that these patients receive the very best care they can receive, as if they were our own precious family. And the only other way that we can do that is by coming together as a team who is comprised of people who are very different. That doesn't mean one, and I'll just say personality is better than another personality, but just to recognize that somebody, and I've learned this with my team too. I make quick decisions. They know this, my team knows this. I'm like, Boom, make a decision. And they're like, Ah, I probably should have given that a little thought because I'm changing my mind again. But I also have some people on my team who are processors. They have to think about it. They need to ruminate over it, maybe ruminate it's not the right term, but they have to give it some thought. And I have learned because of them to adapt my personality, because I see the benefits of it. But if you don't know that about the people on your team, and I'm just using reacting and making quick decisions versus processing, but if you don't know that someone on your team is that way or is in some way different in how they communicate, you can make a lot of false assumptions about that person, which impacts the relationship that you have with that person, which ends up impacting patient care.

Doug Dascenzo:
I think as a leader, you have to not only show your vulnerable side, but you have to encourage people to provide you honest feedback, and I am fortunate that I'm surrounded by people who will provide me that feedback. And I have to admit, sometimes it was very different from my intention and I'm hurt over it. But then I take a step back, and I reflect on it, and ask myself, what should I have done differently to avoid that outcome? And as long as you're willing to continue to invite that and change, your team will grow in their trust and they will continue to provide you the feedback that you need.

Renee Thompson:
Yes, and what you're doing there, Doug, is you are modeling the way, you're modeling the behaviors that you want to see in other people. Somebody gives you feedback. I know some other leaders would, let's just say, not receive it very well. And then chances are if they act out, if they get very defensive, their people are never going to give them feedback again. So how are you supposed to learn and grow and improve without that, but to create that safe place for people to give you feedback? And I look at it as under this umbrella of, My intentions are pure and good. I'm giving you this feedback because I care about you. And we've been talking a lot lately about Radical Candor. Kim Scott wrote that book, Radical Candor, and we'll have that in the show notes, too, but it's, I care enough about you. So, Doug, if you're my chief nurse, and maybe we were at a meeting, and you were a little abrupt with me in front of people and was a little embarrassed that I care enough about you to come to you later on and say, Hey, Doug, can we talk about what happened at the meeting? Not sure you're aware, but this is what happened. Instead, a lot of people won't say anything, but then they'll talk about you behind your back. And how do you even know? You may have been so wrapped up in your own head with all these other things going on, pressures, and things that people don't even know are happening by being willing, by caring enough about you to tell you the truth. That's where the true, and I think it goes back to what we started talking about is compassion. That's where you see evidence of compassion. So I think it's so great that you're creating a culture where people come together as an interprofessional team. You're looking at truly the science behind compassion and how we can expand that. But the last thing I want to talk to you about is, and I know you and I both have a passion for addressing workplace violence. That's my thing: taking a look at creating a safe place for employees and our patients. But can you tell us a little bit about how you're addressing this issue in your organization?

Doug Dascenzo:
For starters, we have a program. It's a canned program where we train people how to avoid violence that might be acting toward them from patients and/or visitors. And that program is very structured. And the skill sets that we hope they develop, they have to practice so that certified instructors can determine if they're competent than to proceed. So that's been one of the strategies we've used. Another one more recently is we developed a team, the safety response team; and the team consists of a security officer, it's generally the officer in charge; it also consists of the house supervisor; and finally, a nurse from behavioral health. And these three will respond to any safety event. The behavioral health nurse focuses more on the patient and what the patient may require to regain control of behavior. Of course, security is responsible for making sure that the victim and those around them are safe. And the house supervisor is the one who mobilizes resources at that point that are necessary to contain the situation and resolve the problem, and that's a 24/7 service that we offer, and it's relatively new. We are using existing resources, but we've trained individuals who respond to these events, and we are receiving really positive feedback from those who have been served by the team. Now, there are other things that we do to help better prepare us for these events, like assessing every patient for probability of violence using. We happen to use the … tool to measure that. And then we have visual cues outside of the patient's room and in the electronic health record, depending on who has access to what so that before they encounter the patient, they are already aware that there may be a likelihood of aggressive behavior, and the instruction we've given to all who enter that space is to contact the nurse who's caring for the patient before they enter the room. To take this a few steps further, we've met with our municipal partners so that they understand what our goals are and why we've set them. We weren't sure if they were aware of the degree of violent behavior that we witnessed, so that's been a learning. And it also helps make sure that we're on the same page when we're developing our plan of action. Sometimes we rely on them to help us, and sometimes we don't. But it has created some strength and partnership, and we felt that was pretty critical.

Renee Thompson:
… that law enforcement?

Doug Dascenzo:
That's law enforcement.

Renee Thompson:
Yes, that's what I was assuming. I just want to make sure.

Doug Dascenzo:
Yes. And then recently, we had an opportunity to testify before the Michigan Legislature on a bill that they were proposing to pass, and in fact, did, which defines degrees of violent behavior and consequences that would occur as a result. For instance, if a patient's family member or significant other possessed a deadly weapon and entered our facility and started to make threats toward a healthcare worker, that would result in potentially up to four years in jail and a $4,000 fine. That's the worst-case scenario. Something assaultive behavior or verbal assaultive behavior might result in up to 93 days in jail and a $1,000 fine. So that was a good first step. I think healthcare workers have felt like they didn't, they weren't afforded the same protections as other members of the community who were victims of assault and … So this was a real big step for the legislature not only to be willing to be educated, but to take some concrete steps forward to protect those that had protected the community so blatantly over the last three years.

Renee Thompson:
So it almost doesn't seem; it's not to say it's not fair. But we put our, the people running into the burning building as we say, during the pandemic, were putting themselves at risk, putting themselves and their families at risk. And it's nice to see now that the communities are recognizing that we are still at risk. You know, there's been an increase in workplace violence, but you are so right. A lot of the public, they do not realize how many acts of violence healthcare providers, healthcare professionals are exposed to on a daily basis. And there's always that threat. There's always like an underlying simmering threat of some type of abuse or violence in healthcare organizations. And it really sounds like you have a comprehensive plan. It's very similar to a rapid response. You have your safety officer, your house supervisor. Love that you have a nurse from Behavioral Health who can immediately go and assess the situation and intervene. But then it's looking at how do you identify patients who maybe even had, and I'm sure you're doing this, they've had, they have a history of becoming violent when they've been either in your organization in the past submission or maybe in another organization, and flagged them both on the outside of the door. And I've seen some organizations will actually flag them in the EMR, where there will be a certain color, like a bar, at the toolbar is a certain color. So, but it's making sure people are aware that this is a patient who has the potential for violence. And then making sure you have your community partners, and they need to know what you're working on so that they can support and intervene. And love the fact that you're saying, like, these are our first steps and working on this because this problem isn't going to go away.

Doug Dascenzo:
Yeah. So the next steps is to continue to educate the legislature on the number of patients with capacity to reason that act violently toward the healthcare workers. There's this belief that if patients are acting out, it's because of their medical condition. And we did a study at one of our hospital facilities and found that 30% of patients who acted out had capacity to reason. They were not being treated at all for a behavioral health problem. And currently, the consequences against patients are much less when compared to the patient's significant other or visitor.

Renee Thompson:
And I appreciate that you're using your data. This is our opinion. No, but you're actually able to demonstrate that this isn't all because they have dementia or alcoholism. And it's also educating the employees too, to basically say, Stop justifying. They have cancer. I feel bad, but they were abusive. And we tend to feel badly because going back to how we started the conversation, we still are so compassionate that we understand that. But we have to get to the point where we say, Doesn't matter. It's still not okay, and we need to do something about it. So this has been a great conversation, and we've really unpacked a lot of things. We started with compassion, and then we talked about the interprofessional team and the importance of really bringing them together. We talked about relationship building. And then, because this is the work that we do, really cultivating that healthy work culture, you have to be addressing workplace violence in your organization. And I can see elements of doing this as a professional team; that's what you're doing. And bringing in that level of compassion, which is so important, compassion for each other, but compassion for ourselves. So if there's a leader listening right now, who is, oh my gosh, I want to be just like Doug. I want to create a culture where people are coming together as a team with compassion, and we're addressing these issues. Where would you suggest they start? What would be a first step for someone?

Doug Dascenzo:
Sometimes the hospital and health associations in their state already have programming, and not only are they connected with programming; they're connected to the legislature. So it helps to have their perspective and their support because they also provide a very important function as they have networks and they reach out to others and provide the same level of education.

Renee Thompson:
That's smart. I actually had never thought to start there, but we say a lot, Don't reinvent the wheel. Somebody is doing something, and it's working. Find out. And going to your hospital association is really a great place to start. And I also think too, as senior leaders getting together, having conversations with other senior leaders, Hey, what are you doing? Hey, here's what we're doing. What's working? What's not working? We talk about interprofessional communication and collaboration within your organization. But how about we do this outside of your organization with not only when I say other executives, other senior leaders, not just nursing? It's beyond the role. And it's all about people who are committed to, and it's their responsibility to create a safe environment for their teams. And I think that can be incredibly helpful and powerful, too. So, Doug, I just want to thank you so much for being willing to share what you're doing at Trinity Health. And if somebody wanted to connect with you, what would be the best way? You're on LinkedIn; we can share your LinkedIn profile. Is that the best way?

Doug Dascenzo:
That's a reliable way. I always look at my LinkedIn and my email, and so they're welcome to connect in. I can generally respond to people within 24 to 48 hours. They'll never wait longer than that. I can promise that.

Renee Thompson:
Wow, wow. That's impressive okay. Very impressive. Again, I want to thank you. And just thank you for all the work that you do to really cultivate a healthy work culture. And it's been just an honor knowing you for as many years as I've known you. And I've always admired your good work that you've done and look forward to even continued amazing work, so thank you. And I want to thank all of you who are listening and for doing your part to actually cultivate a healthy work culture. And if you've enjoyed this podcast, I would so appreciate it if you would rate it, review it, and share it with others. All right, everyone, thanks so much. We'll see you next time.

Renee Thompson:
Thank you for listening to Coffee Break: Breaking the Cycle of Bullying in Healthcare – One Cup at a Time. If you found these practical strategies helpful, we invite you to click the subscribe button and tune in every other week. For more information about our show and how we work with healthcare organizations to cultivate and sustain a healthy work culture free from bullying and incivility, visit HealthyWorkforceInstitute.com. Until our next cup of coffee, be kind, take care, and stay connected.

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Things You’ll Learn:
  • Understanding emotions rather than dictating them is vital for fostering unity amidst adversity.
  • Open communication and empathy play a crucial role in healthcare settings, with a focus on understanding rather than prescribing emotions.
  • Recognizing and embracing diverse personalities within teams is essential for effective collaboration.
  • Comprehensive strategies, including identification, community support, and legislative advocacy, are essential for addressing workplace violence.
  • Education and interprofessional collaboration play crucial roles in addressing workplace violence in healthcare.
Resources:
  • Connect with and follow Doug Dascenzo on LinkedIn.
  • Learn more about Trinity Health on their LinkedIn and website.
  • Buy Kim Scott’s book, Radical Candor,here.
Disclosure: The host may be compensated for linking to other sites or for sales of products we link to. As an Amazon Associate, Coffee Break earns from qualifying purchases.
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