Coffee Break - Mandy Tilton

EP 25: Effective Strategies To Empower Healthcare Leaders

Summary: 

At its core, effective leadership revolves around nurturing and bolstering the growth of individuals within the team.

In this episode, Mandy Tilton, Chief Nursing Officer at BAYADA Home Health Care, discusses the importance of leadership development in addressing workplace issues like bullying and incivility. She talks about her journey from patient care technician to senior nurse leader, emphasizing the significance of continuous learning and being present where the work happens. Mandy highlights the role of the Clinical Advisory Board in fostering interprofessional collaboration and solving challenges in home healthcare, and introduces innovative approaches like the Safety Squad and book clubs for leadership development, stressing the importance of continuous learning for healthcare professionals. She also encourages starting small with activities like monthly Zoom sessions with passionate speakers to empower leaders and drive improvement. 

Tune in and learn how small, inexpensive actions can lead to significant improvements in leadership and overall organizational performance!

About Mandy Tilton:

Dr. Amanda “Mandy” Tilton, is the Chief Nursing Officer at BAYADA Home Health Care, responsible for overseeing clinical standards, optimizing clinical practices, partnering with specialty practice clinical leadership teams on clinician retention and professional development, and implementing a safety culture built on principles of high reliability at BAYADA Home Health Care. Prior to joining BAYADA in 2021, Mandy led the nursing strategy at DaVita Kidney Care as chief nursing officer over a twenty-year career where she worked in many roles, including patient care technician, nurse, administrator, director, and vice president. These responsibilities included all modalities and both chronic and acute dialysis. She is currently on the board of directors for the National Kidney Foundation of Illinois and serves as adjunct faculty at Lewis University.

CB-Mandy Tilton: Audio automatically transcribed by Sonix

Download the “CB-Mandy Tilton audio file directly.

CB-Mandy Tilton: this mp3 audio file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Renee Thompson:
Plants thrive and grow in a peaceful, nourished environment, right? Well, it's the same with human beings. But what if that environment is not so peaceful? What if it's toxic? Welcome to Coffee Break: Breaking the Cycle of Bullying in Healthcare – One Cup at a Time. In this podcast, you'll get practical, evidence-based strategies to help you cultivate and sustain a healthy and respectful work culture by tackling an age-old problem in healthcare: bullying and incivility. I am your host, Doctor Renee Thompson.

Renee Thompson:
Hi everyone! Welcome back to the Coffee Break podcast. Whether you're listening to this or watching wherever you are, I hope you're having a great week. And I just want to thank you for being here today. And all right, let's talk. If you really want to start addressing bullying and incivility in your organization, I always like to think of where are you going to get your biggest bang for your buck? And I'm telling you, it's to develop and equip your leaders. And today, our guest, Mandy Tilton, who is the Chief Nursing Officer at BAYADA Home Health, has done just that. She is just remarkable in being able to commit to developing her leaders even during a global pandemic. So, Mandy, welcome to the show.

Mandy Tilton:
Thank you. I'm honored to be here with you today.

Renee Thompson:
Gosh, I'm so excited. I have to tell you, I've known Mandy now for, I don't know, Mandy, how many years? Five, six?

Mandy Tilton:
At least, at least that long.

Renee Thompson:
Yeah. So Mandy is the Chief Nursing Officer, as I said, at BAYADA Home Health Care. She's really responsible for overseeing clinical standards, clinical practices; she focuses on retention, professional development, and truly implementing a safety culture built on principles of high reliability. But prior to joining BAYADA in 2021, Mandy led the nursing strategy at DaVita Kidney Care as their Chief Nursing Officer. She was there for over 20 years and held many different roles, and that's actually where I originally met Mandy. Mandy asked me to present at one of her, was it called a leadership forum or summit? I can't remember, Mandy.

Mandy Tilton:
A nursing leadership conference. Yep.

Renee Thompson:
Yes, and I met Mandy. And by the way, the first time I spoke at this conference, Mandy was really the MC. And I said to her, Okay, if you ever want to consider a different alternative career. She was probably one of the best MCs I've ever seen. She engaged the audience, it was just so much fun being in the audience. Because, you know, when I keynote a conference, one of my favorite things to do is just to sit there and be in the audience and learn from other people, and I watched Mandy, and she was just great. So we started doing work together every single year. We focused on developing their leaders through these conferences, and then even during the global pandemic, we continued doing this virtually, of course. And now, at BAYADA, she continues to focus on developing her leaders. So, Mandy, I have to ask you: tell us a little bit about your journey, and at what point or what happened that you realized, Oh my goodness, I'm the Chief Nursing Officer here, and I've got a gazillion competing priorities, but one of my priorities has to be developing my leaders? Can you talk to us about that?

Mandy Tilton:
Sure. Well, to tell you a little bit about me, I actually entered into healthcare 20-some years ago as a patient care technician while I was going to nursing school. What was interesting is in that job, the preceptor was actually my mom, who was a nurse, just recently retired, still is a nurse, but now a retired nurse, so she was the preceptor. And so I got real-time feedback all the time in the most, I would say, direct way, but with kindness and compassion. And so, although the feedback I received was direct and it happened at home, it happened in the car ride together to work in the car ride back; it was just what I needed to become successful, to become a high quality what would end up being a clinician and to learn how to give that feedback to others. So I was set up for success because of her.

Renee Thompson:
What a gift to have a mother who tells you the truth because she loves you. You know that. I always say people are more willing to receive critical feedback from someone if they believe their intentions are pure and good. Well, there's nobody's intentions more pure and more good than your mom's, right?

Mandy Tilton:
Absolutely. I agree with that statement wholeheartedly, I lived it. Now, she'll listen to this, so I do need to be fully transparent that there were a couple times that I was pretty overloaded on feedback, and I did fake sleep in the car once or twice just to get a break from it. So in all transparency, there were a couple times I needed a break, but 99% of the time, it was so helpful. So I went to nursing school, I followed in my mom's footsteps and went to nursing school and worked as a nurse, and I always said, I'm never going to kind of like go into the dark side of management. And so I did that almost immediately, about a year into my career within the management, and held a lot of roles, had a lot of opportunities, and then I was kind of like, Well, I'm never gonna, you know, leave an operations area and go into a corporate role, and then I did that almost immediately as well and really loved that role and thrived in it. One thing that's helped me throughout my career and my leadership journey in nursing has been the opportunities I've been provided professionally through employers, however, also advancing my knowledge both through academic achievements. So going through school to obtain my bachelor's, master's, doctorate, and then also just continuing to learn on my own through certifications, reading anything I can get my hands on, signing up and becoming a member of multiple organizations so I can receive e-news. But yeah, these have been some of the highlights of my career, which I think have led me to the space I love, which is being able to care for support and influence nurse leaders to take really good care of their nurses so they can take really good care of patients.

Renee Thompson:
Oh my gosh. I often think if everyone had that mindset that independent of whether or not your organization provides the education, the development opportunities for you, it's almost as though I want to say, it's not an excuse not to do it on your own. And very much like you, my whole life I've been a voracious learner, a reader, I got involved, it's opened doors for me, and I sometimes talk with other nurses who don't feel that, let's just say they're struggling right now with what it means to be a nurse. And I can't help, but I'll ask them, Are you involved? You know, do you belong to a professional nursing organization? Or what are you doing to develop yourself? Because that's actually a strategy for people who are being bullied by a coworker, by someone in a leadership role, is to make sure that they develop themselves with the skills and tools that they need to address it. And it sounds like you've really done this your whole life; you always looked for more. Even though some of these roles like, No, I'm not going to do that, and the door opened, and you stepped in, and it provided you with even additional opportunities, and to inspire other leaders to do the same, especially in your executive role, you're the role model for this. So can you talk to us a little bit more about the organization's role? So if we have other executives who are listening to this right now, what would you say to them? What is a strategy for them if they're currently not, if they currently don't have a plan to develop their leaders? What would you recommend for them as maybe even a starting place? How do you get your leaders involved? Especially right now, they're so busy, and a lot of them say, I don't have the time. What can they do?

Mandy Tilton:
Well, I'm a big proponent of getting as close to where the work actually happens as possible. And so for me, in my current organization, for example, we have eight different practices or different types of care that we provide. And I need to be very closely connected to each of those practices. So I have had the opportunity to lead a really important group that we call the clinical council. That is a clinical practice lead from each of those practices. So right away, that's allowing me to be very closely connected to the work in each unique practice. When you are able to pull together groups like that, you stay more closely connected because you're a constant, at some frequency anyway, communication with those individuals. And then, Renee, something magical happens that you're not even reading. They connect with one another, and they begin to share best-demonstrated practices. So that is a key. And you'll probably pick up on that theme as I talk about more of the groups and how I organize different committees and things like that. But the magic is you learn from these individuals, you're able to disseminate information, and I'll have important communication channels and things because you've got a lot of key players, but then they start to magically share and learn from one another, and from there, the value of our groups just exponentially grows.

Renee Thompson:
So it sounds like what you're saying is, if you're an executive, don't sit in a conference room with other executives and come up with a leadership development plan for your people, but go to where your people are, because if you listen, they will tell you what they need. Because I think we have these structured leadership development programs; you're going to go through one, two, three, and four courses, and then you're, but sometimes that's not what they need. But again, as you said, you're where your people are, and they start talking about what they need connecting with each other; it's a place for them to have conversations with each other, and then you, as the executive, you just pay attention, listen, and learn.

Mandy Tilton:
Absolutely. And as a senior nurse leader, it's critical. And it's my philosophy and my ongoing goal for continuous improvement that I'll never be as good at it as I want to be, but to be visible and approachable. Those are the, I believe, just two most key ingredients for success as a nurse leader. Problems will always arise, and you can get the resources you need and the right people in the room to solve a problem. You can get the right people in a room to work through just about any challenge. However, if you are not visible and approachable and individuals are unwilling or don't feel confident enough to bring things to you, you cannot work through them and solve for issues.

Renee Thompson:
Yes, I've heard this from a lot of the other leaders who I've interviewed too, what made them stand out, especially if they were in an executive role and they were new to that role. And it's not to say anything negative about maybe the previous executive, but it was amazing that there were several times where they talked about being where their people were, so rounding, but then getting into the patient's room, helping nurses pull their patients up. And when I think about even the work that you're doing now in home healthcare, not just sitting in some building, somewhere while your people are out there in the community, but being present so that they see that you're a caring, compassionate, fun human being because the title alone intimidates people: Chief Nursing Officer, Chief Executive Officer. The title alone intimidates people. So by being where they are, you're like, I'm a nurse, just like you. You know? Or really.

Mandy Tilton:
I got kids.

Renee Thompson:
I know, Mandy, you have. How many kids do you have?

Mandy Tilton:
My husband and I together have five. So a lot of experience in that department.

Renee Thompson:
Yes, but I think it's incredibly important. And again, so it sounds like, be where your people are and listen to them because they will tell you without, you know, really articulating a one, two, three, four bullet point, but they will tell you if you listen what they need as far as development.

Mandy Tilton:
Absolutely. And there's this extra benefit that it feels good. I love being in one of our home healthcare offices with the teams and getting to experience the energy and fun that they have delivering care. I love having a meeting with my nurse leaders and getting to geek out, if you will, on all things nursing and network and have fun and lift each other up. So you're getting in involved with your people, you're learning so you can help make their environment better so they can be more successful in delivering safe and high quality care, and it feels nice.

Renee Thompson:
Yeah, it does.

Mandy Tilton:
That's such a neat cycle.

Renee Thompson:
Yes. And I actually just wrote something recently where it was part of my Monday message, and we talked about how we had a retreat here with my team. So everybody came to Tampa and well, not everybody; there were three who couldn't come. So there were about eight of us here. And we're virtual, we're all over the country, but there's nothing better than being in the same room with the people who you work with, having food, you know, having something to drink. You know, we just had an amazing time. And my message was about, go to the meeting. Even if you have a Zoom option, go be where the people are. And I know in-home healthcare, that's not always easy because if you're listening to this, you don't probably know this about me, but I worked five years as a home care nurse. You're out in your car, you're out in the community, you're not always where your colleagues are, but to bring them together because, you know, we always had an office, but, and we did try to have opportunities where we came together and learn together, connected, really tried to build relationships. But Mandy, I'm interested in that transition. So you worked at DaVita Kidney Care for a really long time, and you established an amazing leadership development program there, but then all of a sudden, you switched to home healthcare. Can you tell us, would you mind sharing your story of what made you decide to leave DaVita and go into home healthcare?

Mandy Tilton:
Sure, I'm happy to. It's a question that I do get asked frequently because of my lengthy tenure and commitment to the nephrology space, which I'm still connected to through serving on some boards and things of that nature. However, I experienced firsthand with my grandparents, my maternal grandparents, the importance of providing care in the home. My grandparents, when I was little, well, they lived at that house until they passed. But we had one house in between our house, and then there was a neighbor and then my grandparents. So to say I was close with my grandparents, that would be literally and figuratively. We were very close. So for my whole life, we had lived next door to each other, essentially. So I knew everything about my grandparents' health, we were engaged in all of their activity, and as they got older, this became even more so from the health perspective, with my mother and I both being nurses and all living in the same community. For my grandparents, they had built their home, they had lived in that home since before my mother was born. It was their place of comfort, they had done so many things in their home that you would expect, it's where their Bible studies were held, it was like a central gathering, and for them to stay there was very important. And my mom and I and our family were able to help do that for a while, but then the needs kind of progressed to the point where we alone could not do that. So we were able to find community resources, use nursing, other different important disciplines to keep them in their home for a very, very long time. My grandfather actually passed away before my grandmother, and that was an even more critical point to keep her in her home, to keep her in her environment that she was comfortable with so she could continue to live the highest quality of life as possible after your spouse of 50-plus years leaves. So for me, I lived that I know how different things would have been if we couldn't have done that for them. And unfortunately, not everyone can, but in our situation, because of home healthcare resources, we were able to. And having my grandparents kind of be like my second set of parents, if you will, for so long, giving them that quality was everything.

Renee Thompson:
Wow. So it was really a second calling for you.

Mandy Tilton:
It was, it was. I shared that with you before. It just felt a calling to work in that environment. And boy, was that exacerbated by the pandemic, where anything that could be done in the home had to be done in the home; it was the only option in many cases. We saw the struggles that a lot of congregate living settings went through during the pandemic, where loved ones were separated from each other and things like that, and my interest in keeping individuals in home just continued to grow and grow and grow. Then universe, I think, agreed that that would be a good area for me to look into further by making available to me this position that I'm now serving in at BAYADA.

Renee Thompson:
Yeah. That's incredible, and as I mentioned, I worked as a home care nurse for five years, and you don't just take care of the patient; you're also part of the family. And I remember many patients, I will never forget the experiences that I had in their home, where they live, and their children, you know, their daughters and their sons and the grandkids come over, and I don't know, my home care patients, they always wanted to feed me. You know, they were like, Oh, we just made breakfast, or, At least have a banana, or I made this pound cake. And I'm like, Aww. But they were always just so wonderful. And to be able to keep your grandparents in their home and having the home health as the reason that you're able to do that, I think, is really special. And I love to hear that you had that calling in this space. Can you tell us a little bit about what you're doing at BAYADA for leadership development, and how that may look different than what you've experienced before?

Mandy Tilton:
Absolutely. So I was able to share with you a little bit about the Clinical Council, which is a great group, and right away, that group became so valuable to me on my learning journey with a new organization, the insight that those clinical leaders provided, that I thought, I really, I need the same group, but I need it to be a little bit more geographically expansive, and I need to get closer. I need to get to the people who work directly with the nurses to make these changes that I want to make, and to continue to improve in all things that are nurse facing. And so I actually, I think we're about to celebrate our two-year anniversary, was able to launch a group, we call the Clinical Advisory Board. So my Clinical Advisory Board is made up of a wonderful group of diverse nurses who have all sorts of different experience and backgrounds. We actually have a couple of non-nurse leaders on there too. So behavioral sciences manager, we have some physical therapists. So we have a little bit even more of a cross-functional team than purely nursing. And for this group these individuals are directly connected, directly interacting with our nurses and clinicians who are going into homes, and so this group gets me even closer. For this team, we do meet via Zoom because we are so geographically distributed, but we meet via Zoom. We do about once a month for an hour or so. And this is like the most amazing group to bring ideas to. Anything that's being worked on in the organization can be brought and kind of ideas put to this group to see what their reactions are as different initiatives that are going to be patient-facing or clinician-facing are created. The owners of those will stop in multiple times along the way, course correct, and create new iterations based on the input of this team, and it's just been a lot of fun. Most of these individuals did not know each other before we started working together at this frequency. And if you think about the four phases of a team, right, like you have forming, storming, norming, all the things, the first meeting was like crickets. Like, we're all kind of sitting around, and I'm trying to come up with some cheesy icebreaker, and you know, I could almost be all the discomfort right through the computer, but now I have to kind of move us past the opening discussion to get to work because you can just see how comfortable the group is and how much they enjoy interacting. And I'll tell you one other thing. This group I mentioned, we've solved a lot of challenges and worked through some things, contributed a lot of great advice to our organization, but there's been 1 to 2 different external groups who I've actually brought in when they are looking for guidance for things that are home care related. And I reached out to … say, Let me bring you right to my Clinical Advisory Board; they were the ones that really have the knowledge.

Renee Thompson:
Wow. And it sounds like then this group gets together, and they're almost, and I love that you call them Clinical Advisory Board. So they're the leaders who are then responsible for empowering and equipping their teams who are out in the field. And I love the fact that it's not just nursing, because when I was … Yes, it's got to be interprofessional. When I was a home care nurse, it was always in that home. Me, a therapist, it might be occupational physical therapists, it could be speech therapy. There's always a support person, nursing assistant who would go in to take care of some of their hygiene needs, and then we would have these debriefings, and we would talk as a team. And that was instrumental because it wasn't that I was going in and doing my thing, the physical therapist was doing their thing, we had to communicate. We had to collaborate on the overall, you know, care of that patient. And I love that your clinical advisory board is not just nurses. Now, I know you focus on retention and professional development. So does this group also take a look at professional development needs of your, the people who are out there in the field, or is that something separate?

Mandy Tilton:
Well, this is a group that will comment and have discussion and contribute value to any topic. So yes, we have had those items presented to our group. Just of our most recent meeting this month, we're already planning for Nurses Week in May. And so we met with multiple different departments, such as like our marketing department, our internal rewards and recognitions department, to have those discussions. So yes, this is a group that's highly engaged in kind of all aspects of learning and fulfillment for nursing. I have even more targeted though, or more specific working groups and committees. So after having success with these kind of more, I would say general, because there's the topics that we cover are so valuable. I really thought, what if I could create some really specific groups to work on specific items? One of my groups, and I'm really proud of, that I get to work with frequently, is our group formed called The Safety Squad. So I thought you would be particularly interested to learn about the Safety Squad. So although the name is kind of silly and light-hearted, Safety Squad, we work on very intense things obviously, and have really intense discussions. But this group, we formed at the actually the beginning of 2022, so last year was our second year, and this was a really exciting group to work with. And I put a little bit of a different spin or took a little bit of a different approach to how this group works. So we have the routine meetings. There's all sorts of different representation, which is wonderful again, because everyone has so much unique knowledge and experience. But for this group, in order for us to form and to work together to make decisions and things based on evidence, and then also to contribute to their development and kind of hoping that they'll pay it forward as well and take this approach, we worked through a book together. So we've worked through Zero Harm together. We've worked through the Safety Playbook. And for that group, I actually approached that a little bit differently. It's primarily nurses, but again we have a few non-nurses who are in our group. We actually open each of our meetings by doing a review of one of the chapters of the book, and different individuals, different team members take the lead and cover that chapter, and we engage in dialogue, and then we move into our meeting agenda. So for me, while I love silly icebreakers, I think that I'm well known for, like, if you've been at meetings with me, we're all going to know each other's favorite ice cream, favorite number, all the things, but this was another way to kind of continue discussion and networking, but take it a little bit deeper by adding the book club kind of approach.

Renee Thompson:
Wow, okay. If you're listening, this is your nugget, okay? If you don't have any leadership development happening in your organization, or even if you do, but you're like, Well, it's hard to get people engaged; We have programs, but people don't show up; or, you know, It's the same program we've been delivering for the last ten years, this is pure gold because I have seen this work. And we're actually even doing this with my company where we pick a book, and obviously, you're going to choose something that's related to the work that you do in a hospital and leadership or in-home care leadership. And this is the Safety Squad, so you have the book Zero Harm, makes total sense. But it's kind of a book club. But what you ask people to do is read a chapter; we're going to talk about this next week at the beginning of the meeting, and you just carve out 15 to 20 minutes. How long do you carve out, Mandy? Like, how long?

Mandy Tilton:
It's about that long, yeah. It's about 15 minutes to kick off our meeting. And I mean, the creativity that goes along with this too, you just allow people their own unique style. I jokingly said to them, When it's your chapter to cover, you can just use discussion, you can type something up on Word and email in advance, you can use slides, you can do it through interpretive dance. It is totally up to you. And it's just so fun to see people take the chapter and then present it with their personality and have a lively discussion. It's really been one of my favorite things. Actually, so much of a favorite thing that I've now introduced it to a different group that I have. So you can see me on video. I know not everyone can, but now I've got two bucks going here at the same time.

Renee Thompson:
Well, you know, I'm a big, you know, avid reader, and sometimes I ask my guests what book would they recommend for other leaders. So can you tell us what was that? You just showed me two books. They were pretty quick. Can you tell us what they are?

Mandy Tilton:
Yeah, we've got Team of Teams going right now.

Renee Thompson:
Team of Teams. Who's that by?

Mandy Tilton:
This is General Stanley McChrystal and other authors as well. So we've got Team of Teams, and then we finished Zero Harm, and now we're on the Safety Playbook. And so the Safety Playbook by John Byrnes, Susan Temin, is what we're reading right now.

Renee Thompson:
Wow. I'm going to make sure we have the links to these books in our show notes, okay, after this episode airs. Because again, this is such a golden nugget. One of the strategies, if you look at all successful human beings, and I've studied successful human beings for the last 40 years, they all have one common sort of habit, one thing that they do consistently, and that is they take responsibility for their learning, and they learn something pretty much every single day. They commit to continuous learning no matter what. Now you've got people, obviously, Mandy, that's you. Nobody needs to tell you that you need to go to a class, that you need to get your degree and advance your degree, or, tell the audience what you're doing right now. You're learning something that's pretty critical.

Mandy Tilton:
Yes, I am about halfway through it. I am currently obtaining my black belt in Six Sigma through Villanova University, so it's wonderful. I'm learning so much. For anyone that's not familiar with Six Sigma, it's largely focused on reducing variation to strive for perfection, which perfection is exactly what we want in our line of work, in healthcare and nursing, and so it's been wonderful. Although initially designed for the manufacturing industry, there's so much applicable to the work that we do as nurses.

Renee Thompson:
Oh, absolutely. And I think it's just something else. It's another set of frameworks and tools to add to your toolbox. But the point in all of this is: regardless of whether your organization is providing it or they're not, it's committed to continuous personal and professional development, and the easiest thing to do is to read. There are so many amazing books out there, amazing authors, but to incorporate it as part of your leadership development in your organization. I love when an organization tells me that they have a book club. I love it when they tell me, We just finished your book; they went chapter by chapter. And I think the one thing that you're doing that, all right, I'm going to have to do this with my company because we're reading a book right now; it's actually how to Run a Small Business. And I'm helping my team to understand some of the decisions that we make, or just not me making them up, but there's a strategy for it. But we go over a chapter every month at our team meeting. I think the next chapter, I'm going to ask somebody from my team to present it, not me, so that's brilliant. So I actually got a nice little nugget from you, Mandy. I appreciate that.

Mandy Tilton:
Awesome. Yeah, it's fun to give people that space to get to share what their takeaways were. And sometimes, not sometimes, most of the times, when we take away different information. So I'm, even though my books is dogeared and written all over, and I have all these notes I go through, and I'm actually in real-time highlighting their takeaways as well. So, and I would just add, like, we owe this to Florence Nightingale. Although many of her quotes are just perfect, Florence herself said, Let us never consider ourselves finished nurses; we must be learning all our lives. And I take that seriously because the second we stop learning, we stop progressing healthcare. And as nurses, I believe, and I take this seriously and hold myself accountable to that, we are responsible to lead that ongoing improvement.

Renee Thompson:
We are. It's a philosophy that I have. It's one of my core habits that I learn something every day, I read something instructional or educational every day. Right now, I'm reading Adam Grant's book Hidden Potential. It's always been a book that I've wanted to read, another one we've talked about, but I never read it. So I'm like, and I got it at the library, you know, I rent it, borrowed it from the library. I think I have one chapter left, and it's due to be returned, you know, shortly. But I think what's really powerful, Mandy, is that you almost set it up as an expectation that in this organization, we learn; in this organization, we work on getting better, and we do that in a variety of ways. And it's not just you telling people what to do, it's you're creating the opportunities for people to come together and engage in conversations about the various things that you've already mentioned, you know, safety, and we take a look at our clinical practice. As you know, it's always changing. There's always some new way of doing things in technology, but to always be keeping your finger on the pulse of the changes that are happening and making sure you're proactively learning together as a team is incredibly powerful. So, well, as we start to wrap up, if there's an executive or even a frontline manager on, you know, who's listening right now, and maybe they're frustrated because there really isn't anything in their organization that truly empowers their leaders through leadership development and they wanted to start somewhere, what would you recommend?

Mandy Tilton:
Ahh, so many things come to mind. First, I would say the key is to start. So start; this is the right thing to do, even if it's not going to be perfect. I read this quote lately that said, Who do the fourth graders look up to? Not the parents or the people and the leaders and the school that have it all together; they look up to the fifth graders, right? So just find something, then get started. My recommendation would be to do things that are, I always like to say, inexpensive and not regrettable. So Zoom is a great feature that many organizations have now, or WebEx or some version of that, and you can always start with an educational session like that. We do these in my organization every November. I send out a survey link, which is very inexpensive to all of our nurse political leaders. I ask them what they want to learn about the next year. I literally read the results. So far, this is not costing any money. I read through the results. I organize them from highest frequency to lowest, and at every month, third Tuesday of every month, we have a one-hour Zoom session, and they have created the agenda. So January is whatever highest was February 2nd, March on down. And I go out, and I find people who are passionate and knowledgeable about the topics, and they present for me. I've not had to pay anyone to present again for us anyway. Zoom is something our organization uses, so it's no additional cost, and it's an hour, and we record it. So if someone isn't available at 1:00 or whenever the session is, they can listen to it later. So just start small with something inexpensive, not regrettable. Ask the people what they want because people are going to invest in learning more if that's a topic they care about, and just give it a shot, and allow yourself space to know it's not going to be perfect at the beginning, but each time you'll do a little bit better.

Renee Thompson:
Wow, all right. That's your second major nugget. I mean, this has been a great conversation, but I love what you did. Every November, you send out a survey: What do you want to learn? You collate it, you identify the top. And like January is the topic based on what got the most votes, February is the next one, and you just bake it into what you're currently already doing. You're meeting once a month anyway, so you bake it in. I think that's golden. So thank you. Thank you for being a guest and just for all of your great work, really empowering leaders and their teams to truly serve and care for the patients who, you know, that's why we're in healthcare, is to care for those patients. And, Mandy, if people want to connect with you, what is the best way? I know you're on LinkedIn, but is that okay that we link to that?

Mandy Tilton:
That's the best place. Send me a message on LinkedIn, and we can talk more about this important topic. So like I've mentioned a few times: we all learn from one another. As brilliant as Renee is, she doesn't have all the answers. I don't have all the answers, but when we get together, we've got a lot of answers.

Renee Thompson:
Yes, it's the collective mind, okay? It's not any one of us. It's all of us. And that's why, you know, I love having conversations with amazing leaders like Mandy, who every single time teach me something that I didn't know, or give me an idea of something that I can do better, and that's what we should be doing. And, you know, if we get back to, you know, my core of what I do, bullying and incivility and especially nurses, you know, eating their young, this is the opposite of that. This is nurses supporting each other, helping each other, growing each other, you know, leaders doing the same, and then you expand it to the whole entire interprofessional team. That's what it's going to take for us to truly overcome the challenges that we're all facing right now. So, Mandy, from the bottom of my heart, I can't thank you enough for being here and just for all of your good work. Thanks for being a guest today.

Mandy Tilton:
Thank you. It's always a pleasure to interact with you.

Renee Thompson:
And thank you. Okay, thanks so much if you're listening right now. I am so committed to making sure that we provide you, our listeners with practical skills, tools, and strategies, but you need to be able to show up to be able to do that. So thank you so much for being here, for taking time out of your day. Don't forget to rate this episode, review our podcast. And you know what? If you found something valuable here, don't forget to share this with a colleague who may need to hear this right now. And as we wrap up, I just want to remind you that the way we treat each other is truly just as important as the great care that we're all providing. Thanks, everyone. Take care!

Renee Thompson:
Thank you for listening to Coffee Break: Breaking the Cycle of Bullying in Healthcare – One Cup at a Time. If you found these practical strategies helpful, we invite you to click the subscribe button and tune in every other week. For more information about our show and how we work with healthcare organizations to cultivate and sustain a healthy work culture free from bullying and incivility, visit HealthyWorkforceInstitute.com. Until our next cup of coffee, be kind, take care, and stay connected.

Sonix is the world’s most advanced automated transcription, translation, and subtitling platform. Fast, accurate, and affordable.

Automatically convert your mp3 files to text (txt file), Microsoft Word (docx file), and SubRip Subtitle (srt file) in minutes.

Sonix has many features that you’d love including secure transcription and file storage, upload many different filetypes, generate automated summaries powered by AI, collaboration tools, and easily transcribe your Zoom meetings. Try Sonix for free today.

Things You’ll Learn:
  • Leaders who prioritize being present and approachable tend to foster more open and effective communication channels.
  • Successful leaders embrace continuous learning, which serves as a cornerstone for both personal and professional growth.
  • Interprofessional collaboration forms the foundation for effective patient care in healthcare settings.
  • Taking charge of one’s learning journey is not just beneficial but essential for continuous progress and development.
  • Modest investments in impactful initiatives can yield significant enhancements in organizational performance.
Resources:
  • Learn more about Mandy Tilton here!
  • Discover more about BAYADA Home Health Care on LinkedIn and their website.
  • Buy Zero Harm here.
  • Grab a copy of The Safety Playbook here.
  • Get Team of Teams here.
Disclosure: The host may be compensated for linking to other sites or for sales of products we link to. As an Amazon Associate, Coffee Break earns from qualifying purchases.
Scroll to Top
WAIT!
Do you want to learn how to avoid the 5 most common mistakes leaders make when addressing bullying & incivility?

Free Resources

Receive 33 Scripts to Address Disruptive Behavior When You Don’t Know What to Say