Coffee Break - Lauren Smith

EP 22: The Power of Presence

Summary: 

Leaders who prioritize presence and approachability can significantly enhance trust and loyalty within their teams, leading to a transformative impact.

In this episode, Lauren Smith, CNO at Saint Alphonsus Health System, shares her journey of fostering respect and safety amongst her colleagues, reshaping the work culture around her into one of empathy and engagement. She shares practical tips on how she’s using her own personality and vulnerabilities as strengths to bond with her teams and create an environment where everyone feels heard, valued, and part of a united front. Throughout this conversation, Lauren shares how she created the “CNO office hours” to bridge the gap between leadership and staff, ensuring that communication is not just top-down but a shared experience. She explains how, with a focus on relational rounding and being present, she’s shown that true leadership is about rolling up your sleeves and standing shoulder-to-shoulder with your team. 

So pour yourself a cup of your favorite brew and listen in as we uncover the secrets to a healthier, where the cycle of bullying and incivility is replaced with trust and collaboration.

About Lauren Smith:

Lauren Smith, MSN, RN is serving in a dual senior nursing leadership role as the Saint Alphonsus Health System (Idaho and Oregon) and Regional Medical Center Chief Nursing Officer (Boise, Idaho). In her role, Lauren is responsible for the clinical and administrative leadership, planning, monitoring, and evaluation of safe, high-quality patient care across the four Saint Alphonsus hospitals. Lauren is known throughout southern Idaho as a dedicated, highly effective senior-level nursing leader. She has over 23 years of nursing experience in critical care, performance and process improvement, risk management, and clinical operations in both hospital and ambulatory-based settings. Lauren holds a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Boise State University and a Master of Science in Nursing from Western Governors University.

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Renee Thompson:
Plants thrive and grow in a peaceful, nourished environment, right? Well, it's the same with human beings. But what if that environment is not so peaceful? What if it's toxic? Welcome to Coffee Break: Breaking the Cycle of Bullying in Healthcare – One Cup at a Time. In this podcast, you'll get practical, evidence-based strategies to help you cultivate and sustain a healthy and respectful work culture by tackling an age-old problem in healthcare: bullying and incivility. I am your host, Doctor Renee Thompson.

Renee Thompson:
Hi everyone, welcome to the Coffee Break podcast. I don't know if you've been paying attention lately, but bullying and incivility are on the rise. And we've been dealing with this for so long, but it seems as though recently things have gotten a little worse. And so this podcast is really designed to help you as healthcare leaders finally do something about bullying and incivility so that you can cultivate a professional, respectful, and kinder work culture. And today, we're going to talk to an executive leader, Lauren Smith, who has done a remarkable job actually cultivating and sustaining a healthy work culture in her organization. So, welcome to the Coffee Break podcast, Lauren.

Lauren Smith:
Thank you. Happy to be here.

Renee Thompson:
Yeah, really excited because Lauren and I only recently met, so I'll introduce her, actually. She is the CNO of both the Saint Alphonsus Health System and the Regional Medical Center. And in her role, she's responsible for clinical and administrative leadership, planning, monitoring, and evaluation of safe, high-quality patient care across the four Saint Alphonsus hospitals. She is known throughout southern Idaho as a dedicated, highly effective senior-level leader, and she has over 23 years experience in critical care, performance and process improvement, risk management, clinical operations, both inpatient so in the hospital and ambulatory care. And we met because I've done some work at Saint Alphonsus, and you weren't there yet, but really worked with the leaders and the educators to equip them to address disruptive behaviors, and they were just so wonderful. And then I found out that you stepped into the role, and what you've been able to do has just, really just inspired me. And so, really wanted to talk to you about how you've managed to sustain a healthy work culture. So tell us a little bit more about yourself and your leadership journey, and maybe a little bit about Saint Alphonsus.

Lauren Smith:
Sure, so I'm newer in my role as chief nursing officer. I came in at the end of June this year, and prior to that, I was with Saint Alphonsus Health System over the clinic setting. So those outpatient doctor office, urgent care type settings. So I've been with Saint Alphonsus for almost a year and a half now, and prior to that, I worked in a different healthcare system where I that's where I got all my bedside experience and kind of first cut my teeth and leadership roles over risk management and patient safety. I learned a lot about how to do process problem solving and process improvement in general and then stepped into the orthopedic space where I took over the leadership of a number of orthopedic practices, as well as programs that were in the hospital, in the clinics, and also in the community, working with a lot of different community partners. And all of those things have really helped to kind of build this platform that I feel like I have a good foundation for and standing up in the CNO role. But as a result, and working as a bedside nurse and a lot of different departments, I have a very strong passion both for patient safety and how we treat our people, which is not just our patients and families but all of our colleagues, our physicians, every level of the team from our environmental services team and our patient safety attendants or sitters all the way up through the ranks, up to providers, surgeons and executive leaders. And so, for me, I really try to beat the drum of we're all on the same team, and at any point, anybody should feel welcome and safe to raise their hand and ask a question or point out a safety concern that they have.

Renee Thompson:
Yeah, I think that's so powerful. When I think about your experiences, I think what really makes you so well-rounded is the fact that you have both inpatient and ambulatory care experience, a lot of leaders that focus on the inpatient side. And honestly, the work that we do, most of our work is in-hospital, patient care services. However, we've really started to branch out into ambulatory care centers, clinics, you know, freestanding dialysis centers. And I'm sure you've seen what we have seen. It's the same bad behaviors, they just show up a little differently. So inpatient you have your shift wars between like your day shift in your night shift. When you look at some of the clinics, it's the early start versus the late start or this hallway versus that hallway, right?

Lauren Smith:
Mm-hmm, or floors.

Renee Thompson:
Periods.

Lauren Smith:
This floor versus that floor, you know?

Renee Thompson:
So that really gives you almost the fodder for you to be, step into this role and really recognize and do something about some of the ways these behaviors show up. And I love the fact that we're all on the same team. }

Lauren Smith:
Yeah, and everybody should…

Renee Thompson:
Can you tell us a little bit about, all right, you've only been there since June, what was it like for you stepping into this role, knowing that you're passionate about helping people to feel welcomed, to feel safe, to speak up, and, you know, you have this passion for patient safety? So, what were some of your challenges maybe when you first started in this role? And then can you give us some strategies on how you've overcome them?

Lauren Smith:
Yeah, so you know, I think one of the biggest challenges was trying to figure out who's who in the zoo, you know? Who is this person? What is your role? Where do you belong? How long have you been here? And honestly, I wasn't even really too concerned about anybody's history. I really like to meet people and form my own opinions versus kind of hearing all the buzz on the street initially. And so once I had an opportunity to get to know a lot of people, then I started listening to the buzz. I am a big boots-on-the-ground person. It rounds are what fill my cup. If I can be out with my team, out talking with everybody, you know what's working well, what's not working well. And it was funny because initially there were a number of people I came in, I think it was like 6 a.m. on a Sunday morning, and there was immediate like, who are you and what are you doing here? And I told them my role immediately thought they were in trouble, and so then I just make a joke of it. Well, should you be in trouble? Is there something you would like to confess now? Because we are a Catholic organization, so I'm going to give you that opportunity, and they're like, no, no, no, no, just surprised because we don't always, we haven't had that in the past. Just trying to be present because I think if you can create this presence, then you start to build trust. And it doesn't even have to be a lot of interactions, but if they see you, they see your face, they find you approachable, and you have to make a very conscious effort to make yourself approachable. So I don't wear a suit every day. A lot of times, I'll have, I don't wear full scrubs. I'll always have something to kind of dress it up a little bit, but I don't want to be known as one of the suits running around on the floor. So, and actually, we don't have much of a mentality of that in our organization in general, which was a great place to be able to step into.

Renee Thompson:
Yeah.

Lauren Smith:
We have a nice shared governance structure that was already set up before I came, but it was still pretty novice. And so the CMO I replaced she retired. And so we had, it was wonderful, we had a little bit of a handoff opportunity. And then I came in and our first shared governance meeting without her present because she did a wonderful job. I just said, okay, guys, we're wiping the agenda. I just want to, tell me everything. What do you love about working here? What do you worry about working here? What scares you? Show me. Where do you think your next patient safety issue will be? And it was quiet at first. It usually just takes one icebreaker. One person starts talking, and then we spent an hour and a half meeting. We spent the whole rest of the meeting there just talking. And I asked them. I said, you know, how can we create more scenarios like this for folks that aren't on the shared governance structure? And somebody said, well, you just need to have times where we can come and visit you. And so out of that came this concept of the CNO office hours. And it started as a, I made the managers, I'm going to create an appointment, and I need the managers to just send the appointment out to their teams. And I had some ground rules in there because I wasn't sure how busy it was going to be. And the first time nobody came, and I was like, well, that's okay, I guess. I got a few hours to check my email, and I know there's always there's no shortage for sure of things to worry about.

Renee Thompson:
You are sitting there twiddling your thumbs like, oh, what we're going to do? Nobody showed up, so I have nothing to do.

Lauren Smith:
No, I just feel restricted because I was like, oh, I want to go round people up. But then what if somebody comes? And so I was like, okay, for the next time, I need to think through this a little bit. And so then, kind of started my own mini-process improvement activity. So the next time, I went and attended huddles, and I wrote it on their huddle boards: CNO office hours at this time. And I hold the CNO office hours are almost always on a Friday so I can catch my weekend and my nonweekend people for the most part, and we do from 6 a.m. to 8:30 a.m., and you can come as a group, or you can come as an individual, but it means that your day shift people can come in a little early and catch me and the night shift people can catch me on their way out the door.

Renee Thompson:
Sure.

Lauren Smith:
So the next time, I got two people, and I just was like, you know what? I know we have kind of, these guardrails that we've put around this for when the next person comes but just talk. Let's just chat until the next person shows up, and then I'll give you a little time to wrap up your thoughts, and we'll swap seats. And I told them, I said they're confidential. You can come in, we're going to shut the door. And I'm kind of in the center of the building, one wall is a solid concrete wall, and the doors are heavy. And I just tell them, you could cry, you can scream, you can swear, we can laugh. We do whatever. We can talk about whatever you want to talk about while the door is shut, and this should be a safe space for you. I always keep Kleenex in here. I've got Snakes in here. Whatever people need. The first few came and it was great, and I sent them a handwritten thank you note. And then I got a handwritten thank you note back saying, thank you so much for this time. I'm going to tell everybody they should come see you.

Renee Thompson:
It's so remarkable, and it's so like human beings. What happened with you is such a pattern where they don't trust you yet. What are these office hours all about? I'm not going. Or, did you go? No, I didn't go. So, you know, there's some chatter there.

Lauren Smith:
Yeah.

Renee Thompson:
Then all it takes is one person to go and they find out that you weren't lecturing them, or this was purely, I'm here for you. And, yeah, I think you've done such a great job listening to your team and creating that environment where they can truly speak their mind. And I love that not only did you have those meetings, and I know it's really grown from there, but you took the time to send them a handwritten note. We encourage all leaders to do these little handwritten notes with something specific, you know, for their employees, you know, something that they're acknowledging some recognition but do it with a handwritten note, and I see this all the time. I was just working with a client, and we did these kickoff sessions. We do three, and it always happens the first kickoff that we have hardly any of the staff show up. It's all the leaders, okay? It's the physicians. It's all the leaders. Because here's what the staff think, they think they're going to get lectured. They think they're going to get yelled at. They think it's a bait and switch. You know, they don't trust, and then they realize that, no, this is pretty cool. And it was great that I could talk to Lauren. You know, it's just, you know, Lauren and I took chatting, you know, having a conversation. So then they let everybody else know, and then the floodgates open and people actually respond to tell us about that and how you've been able to manage this. Because when you and I talked the last time you had to, you know, create some actual appointments for people because you got so busy.

Lauren Smith:
Yeah. So what I did, I worked with one of our people who does a lot of process design and website development type things, and first we created a screensaver that has my picture. It has CNO office hours on it, and we tried all sorts of different signup ways through the screensaver, it didn't work very well. So now we just put the dates, and then they go into our main Saint Alphonsus Health System webpage, and there, the top link says Boise CNO office hours. And they go in, and they just pick a slot, and they're set up in 15-minute slots, but nothing happens in 15 minutes. And so I always encourage people, take a block, you know, take 2 or 3 depending on how long you want to talk for. And then it puts an appointment on their calendar, it puts an appointment on my calendar. It also gives them an option for a virtual meeting as well, not just in person, and they get to pick.

Renee Thompson:
Yeah, that's super smart. I think of the people who, they want to meet with you, but they're not at work, and they're not going to drive in just for 15 minutes.

Lauren Smith:
Totally. Yeah, yeah. And so, actually, though, nobody has picked the online option. They all come in person, which is so fun. I love that part, that they're willing to come in person.

Renee Thompson:
And they know you have treats in your office too, okay? And they can actually hang out with you and, you know, if they want to, but it's more person personal. Absolutely.

Lauren Smith:
What was really rewarding is the other day, our ICU manager had said that one of our nurses was, I think they were in a department meeting, or there was a group of people talking, and one of her nurses kept saying, oh, yeah, well, you know, I talked with Lauren and this and that, and then Lauren and I talked about this, and here's our ideas to the point where it was such familiarity that the manager was like, did we hire a nurse named Lauren? Who are you talking about? And he goes, the CNO. And she was like, he was talking about you like you were one of the peers, one of the nurses up there taking care of patients shoulder to shoulder with everybody else. And I was like, well, but that's how it really should be with your leadership team, between your frontline and the leadership is we should all be reading from the same sheet of music, essentially. And for me, that manager coming to share that story was kind of that true test of how are we doing with flattening the hierarchy and making this really inclusive environment, which I think establishes then this workplace where the bullying and incivility, it's not just me that has to run after people and chase that down. They start holding each other accountable because they know that I'm going to hold them accountable too. We have a zero-tolerance policy for that, and we get pockets of it and try and squash them really quick.

Renee Thompson:
And you're so right. When you look at flattening that hierarchy, they need to see you as part of the team. It's not the staff and the management, especially the executive management. And for this, just that word bothers me, that whole management, I look at it as leadership, but I get it. You shared a story with me the last time we talked that I think really shows the importance of being present with your team where they are. And I don't know if you remember you were rounding, and you were telling me that you were in the ICU because that's your happy place.

Lauren Smith:
It is.

Renee Thompson:
And saw a patient who was slouching, and you went in to pull the patient up. Do you remember that story?

Lauren Smith:
Yes, yeah.

Renee Thompson:
Can you share that with us? It was so, that was, as soon as you told me that story. I'm like, okay. Yep, she got it. She gets it.

Lauren Smith:
Yeah. So I'd actually just, if it's what I'm thinking of because this happened a few times now, I had popped up out of the stairwell into one of our ICU areas, and there was a nurse who had just come out of a room, and she's looking around. It's clear she's looking for help. And I'm like, what do you need? And she goes, uh, I go, what do you need? What can I help you with? And I look in, at the patient. I go, does your patient need a boost? And she goes, yeah, I need another set of hands. And I'm like, already walking past her, pulling out a set of gloves, and we give the patient a boost up. And the nurse said, I'm sorry; you shouldn't ever have to do that. I said, what? I'm a nurse, too. We're all here working together. We have to take care of each other. Of course, it can help boost up a patient or a lot of other things for that matter.

Renee Thompson:
I think that's what it was when you said, I'm basically, you're still a nurse, you're still a nurse. And that always bothers me, even the role that I have right now, I'm not working in a hospital, you know, I am not taking care of patients anymore. And there have been times where people have said, oh, she used to be a nurse. And I start twitching because I'm like, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa. No, no, no, no, no. I am still a nurse, and I can still be right next to you helping you. I might not have the skill set like I used to, because if you ask me to set up an art line right now, I don't know if I can remember how to do that, but I can certainly help you. And I love that you get in and you round, and you just don't walk through the hallways checking everything out. No, you're you're rolling up your sleeves. You're getting dirty with them. And it's not what you say; it's what you do.

Lauren Smith:
Absolutely.

Renee Thompson:
Truly been able to do that so well in between that, your shared governance, I love that you just your first meeting with them like, no agenda, we're just going to, we're just going to talk. Because I don't know that, first of all, I don't know that's happening as often as it should. And there's no blame here, so if you're an executive and you're not meeting with your team, and you're not rounding and pulling up your sleeves like there's no judgment here, sometimes it's just, the conditions aren't set up for you to do that. And how do you prioritize your time? And so I know that those are challenges that CNOs face. But where can you at least create opportunities to spend some time with your team, and you've done that so well? Can you share with us any of those challenges that you faced and being able to do this consistently?

Lauren Smith:
Yeah, I think there's just, there's so many priorities all the time. And where everybody, especially in healthcare, and I recognize this as a universal, but everybody is being asked to do more with less. And how do you just continue to rally your teams to be excited to come to work every day, recognizing that we might be short-staffed or we might have too many patients that we struggle to bed? And I think that when they see you as a leader, and you're willing to be present, like I go round through the emergency department first thing in the morning, how many borders do we have? How do things look? What is our nursing situation? You know, how many sick calls do we have? We've got some activities going now where we're piloting some creative staffing models for boarding ER patients, where we had a floor that's not used anymore, and now we have a nurse educator with 2 to 3 new graduate nurses that are there doing side-by-side care with each other. It's an amazing learning environment for those new graduate nurses. And then how rewarding is that for that preceptor to kind of have their own space? It's their own group of patients where they get to do some new things. But you're working with real patients and families who came in today through the emergency department, not planning that and certainly not planning to be admitted into the hospital. So, I think it's really just coming to the level where everyone else is at. You know, if your team is having a rough day, then I think it's spending a short amount of time to allow for that commiseration. But then it's like the next hour, the next hour, and what are we going to do differently, and how can we make it better? And if we've got team members in a funk, how do we pull them out of that in a really genuine way that meets them where they are? Because I think sometimes that's the most important part, is taking the time to listen to you even know where to start so you can meet them where they are that day.

Renee Thompson:
And, you know, if you're listening, you might think, well, it's not to say, how does this help you to cultivate a healthy work culture? When your employees feel valued, heard, that you care about them, they'll do anything for you. And rounding, we're huge advocates for rounding, and I know a lot of leaders are asked to round, and they're asked to round on their patients, and they're asked to round, and you know, you have these checklists that you have to go through. We really encourage, and I think this is really, Lauren, what you're doing, is these relational rounds. And so maybe if you're a senior leader and you think, okay, I'm going to spend, maybe it's one day a week for an hour, like, what can you do? It's not an all-or-nothing like, oh, I can't do that. I don't have the time. What could you do? And maybe that's what it is. Maybe you start half an hour, but our relational rounding, what we recommend is you focus on three things. So, in your case, you'd focus on your employees, not the patients, it's the employees. And the first goal is just to build a relationship with someone in that department. So, build a relationship. The second is to pitch in and help, okay? And the third is to catch them doing something right. And the whole pitching in to help. I think when they see their leader actually getting dirty with them, the trust in that leader just skyrockets. And again, they're, they'll do anything for you because they feel, because you represent the organization. You as a, especially an executive leader, you are the organization, and how you treat them and whether they have trust in you or not reflects the organization. And so, oh my gosh, I love how you've just adopted these principles, and you're living them despite the challenges that you're facing.

Lauren Smith:
Yeah, and some tips could be use the conference rooms on the floors for your meetings.

Renee Thompson:
Yeah.

Lauren Smith:
So if you've got 10 minutes or 15 minutes between meetings but you know that you're meeting that day is on Four South, perfect. Leave right after the last one, go to Four South. Go and spend some time with the team there before you have to walk into your meeting. So sometimes I'll try and make my meetings a part of my travel time in between things, or I will try to keep the meetings on point. You know, we came here to work on this, and instead of spending a bunch of time chit-chatting to burn up the rest of the clock, which can be a really easy habit to get into. I look, I'm like, oh, I got 20 minutes. I can run down to the emergency department; I can run up to our general surgery floor, and just check on the team. And I know that it's not a long time, but I'm going to do what I can to make it meaningful, and I'm not going with paper. So I don't take a checklist, I don't take, sometimes, I'll take paper, but it's blank, to jot down a few notes on it's an idea comes up or I see somebody in the hallway, and I want to make sure I remember to send them a thank you note. I'll jot myself a little note, but they don't have to be big, long, drawn-out sessions. It's small moments of time because, in reality, that's what your teams are going to remember. Are those small moments in time where you were able to make an impact in their day?

Renee Thompson:
I so appreciate your savviness and your smart. We always say this too, you don't add another meeting. You augment an existing meeting, or you take a look at where can I piggyback on something that I'm already doing instead of creating something new. So you're right, if you're meeting somewhere and you get, you know, ten minutes, I always say I've given you back the gift of time. If we end a meeting before we were supposed to, then where you are, that's where you round. Or can you just again augment what you're currently doing to incorporate some of this rounding so you don't see it as a separate thing? But it's just, I love how you said travel time. As we start sort of wrapping up, I wrote down these three things, okay, these sort of strategies. And I want you to tell me these are the three, or would you add anything else: round on your people, okay? And while you're rounding, you are ready to pitch in and help. And you know, we talked a little bit about, you're getting to know your people. Listen to groups, you know, the shared governance. You just sat, and you listened, and it sounds like that listening is now the third, carried over into your CNO office hours, which I think is so smart just to have that time. And people get to know that, oh, I can always schedule time with Lauren because she has this setup and encourages us to do that, and people have gotten to trust that it's going to be worth their time, because building relationship with their CNO, I think, is incredibly important, and a lot of employees really want to do that. They just don't know how to do that. You've given them the way to do that. So is there anything else that you would add to that?

Lauren Smith:
I think the only thing I would add is to just, to be yourself, you know, people see through if you come across as fake or you're overly jovial when that's not your style, just be who you are, and let, share that with your team. Let them see these little glimpses of who you are. I love to laugh and have fun, and I think that, you know, if I, the other day, I was looking for something in Epic, and I had a whole group of nurse leaders around the table, and I was like, oh, I found that on the first try, I didn't even have to ask anybody, and they all laughed. And so I think just lightning up a little bit, loosening a little bit, and kind of show people who you are and don't be afraid to just be yourself. That's part of why you were hired into your role. And so I think that's what I would empower other nurse leaders, is to be themselves within reason and share some of who they are with their teams.

Renee Thompson:
I love that. I know so many people, when they get into a leadership role, especially in executive leadership role, they think they need to be so professional and articulate and perfect and have the answers for everything. And that's not what you want to convey to your team because they will see right through you, too. They will see right through you, but just be you. And I know healthcare is a serious business. Obviously, we are saving lives. We have real tragedies, and it is not easy. Yet at the same time, you can have fun and kid around with each other, and you being basically what you're saying, Lauren, is you being you is you being vulnerable, too.

Lauren Smith:
Absolutely.

Renee Thompson:
You don't know everything, and there are some things you're really good at and other things maybe you're not so good at. And thank goodness you can admit it. And you know, somebody else on your team is surely going to be better at something than you are, and you know, ask them for help. I think that really not only helps your staff, your nurses, and the teams, but your leaders too.

Lauren Smith:
Absolutely.

Renee Thompson:
… times that with leaders, they think they have to be perfect. So if their executive admits that they're not, and they are really the same person at work as they are at home, it gives them sort of permission to do the same.

Lauren Smith:
Yep, I agree 100%.

Renee Thompson:
This has been so helpful. As I said, when you and I had a conversation not too long ago, I thought these are some very good practical strategies that will really help anyone who's in any type of leadership role really cultivate that healthy work culture. And I'm going to take it back to originally, what you said is, show everybody that they're on the same team, including the leader, same team. All right, Lauren, if people want to connect with you, I know you're on LinkedIn. Can we include your LinkedIn profile in the show notes?

Lauren Smith:
Absolutely, please do.

Renee Thompson:
We will put Lauren's profile link in our show notes. And I want to thank you for being willing to share your stories, your strategies. I think you've done a terrific job, and I know a lot of the leaders and the staff at Saint Alphonsus, they've also been saying really great things about you and your leadership. So I'm hoping that those of you who are listening, especially if you're new in your role, just to think about what you can do as a leader to really start building that relationship with your team, and that's part of cultivating a healthy work culture. So thank you so much for being here, and thanks to all of you who are listening. We talked a lot about bullying and incivility, and I started the session talking about how prevalent that it is right now, but we can do something about it. I mean, think about it. All you really need are some tools and some strategies to actually take action and stop the cycle of bullying and incivility in healthcare. Don't forget to follow us and post a review. We so appreciate you. Take care, and until the next time.

Renee Thompson:
Thank you for listening to Coffee Break: Breaking the Cycle of Bullying in Healthcare – One Cup at a Time. If you found these practical strategies helpful, we invite you to click the subscribe button and tune in every other week. For more information about our show and how we work with healthcare organizations to cultivate and sustain a healthy work culture free from bullying and incivility, visit HealthyWorkforceInstitute.com. Until our next cup of coffee, be kind, take care, and stay connected.

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Things You’ll Learn:
  • Leaders who prioritize presence and approachability wield transformative power in cultivating trust and loyalty within their teams.
  • Lauren Smith revolutionized communication through the implementation of CNO office hours, facilitating genuine and confidential discussions that bridge the gap between leadership and staff.
  • Relational rounding, a strategic approach for senior leaders to bolster their connection with their teams by actively acknowledging team members’ strengths and being more hands-on, embodies the concept.
  • Leaders who actively engage and collaborate with their teams possess the ability to completely reshape an organization’s culture.
  • Effective relationship-building hinges on practical communication strategies and the demonstration of authenticity as a leader, including the willingness to seek assistance when needed.
Resources:
  • Learn more about Lauren here!
  • Discover more about Saint Alphonsus on LinkedIn and their website.
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