Coffee Break - Kristen Aviles

EP 12: How A Healthcare Leader Is Stopping Workplace Bullying

Summary: 

Bullying and incivility happen because healthcare leaders allow room for such behaviors.

In this episode, Kristin Aviles, Nurse Manager at West 3, talks about tackling workplace bullying and cultivating a healthy work environment by emphasizing the importance of internal and external dialogue. Kristin shares her 20 years of nursing experience, emphasizing the challenges in healthcare and the necessity for dedicated leadership to face disruptive behaviors. She explains the strategies she used to transform a challenging department into one known for its positive culture, such as creating a culture of safety and empowering staff to address workplace violence. Kristin also introduces the concept of “Chatter Matters,” and highlights the significance of psychological safety, encouraging leaders to seek feedback, provide constructive criticism, and ensure effective communication.

Tune in and learn how addressing disruptive behaviors, fostering psychological safety, and infusing joy into the workplace can contribute to creating a healthier work environment!

About Kristin Aviles:

Kristin Aviles, Nurse Manager at West 3, is a dynamic nursing leader with a rich and diverse background encompassing two decades of dedicated service to the nursing profession. Her journey began as a med-surg nurse, gradually transitioning through roles such as telemetry nurse and step-down unit nurse, where she honed her expertise in critical care. In her extensive career, Kristin has also contributed significantly to the post-anesthesia care unit, showcasing her versatility in various nursing domains.

For the past 13 years, Kristin has excelled in nursing leadership roles. Holding a Doctorate of Nursing Practice and a Gold Innovation Fellowship in Change Science, Kristin stands out as a proven systems thinker. Her professional skills include building resilient teams, fostering cultures of safety and community, leading change management initiatives, and mentoring emerging nurse leaders.

Kristin is known for her deep commitment to promoting healthy work environments and actively addressing workplace violence within her teams. Embodying a lifelong learner mindset, Kristin thrives on staying current with the latest advancements in nursing practices and leadership strategies and continues to inspire positive change within the nursing community.

Coffee Break_Kristin Aviles: Audio automatically transcribed by Sonix

Coffee Break_Kristin Aviles: this mp3 audio file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Renee Thompson:
Hi everyone! Welcome back to the Coffee Break podcast. As you know, bullying and incivility happen because they can, and actually, bad behavior is on the rise right now, and it truly takes dedicated leaders like all of you listening to put a stop to it, and that's what this podcast is all about. It's giving leaders the skills and tools that they need to actually stop it. Today, I'm excited to have a conversation with Kristin Aviles, who is someone I met a couple of months ago who's doing just that. She's actually doing something to not only address disruptive behaviors, but to cultivate a healthy work environment. Kristin, welcome to Coffee Break.

Kristin Alives:
Thank you so much for having me, Renee. It's very nice to be here. Good Morning.

Renee Thompson:
Well, thank you. And did I say your last name, right? Because I think I struggled a little bit. How did I do?

Kristin Alives:
A little bit. It's Aviles, but close.

Renee Thompson:
I was close, so thank you. To officially introduce Kristin, she has spent the last 20 years working in a variety of capacities within nursing. She started as a med-surg nurse. She was a telemetry nurse. Kristin transitioned into a step-down unit nurse, and that's my background. I've always worked step-down. She also worked in a post-anesthesia care unit and has been in a nursing leadership role for the past 13 years in both inpatient and ambulatory care settings. Kristin holds a Doctorate of Nursing Practice and completed the Gold Innovation Fellowship in Change Science, currently in 2023. She's a proven systems thinker with demonstrated expertise in building resilient teams, cultivating a culture of safety and community, spearheading change management initiatives, and mentoring new nurse leaders. I love that about Kristin. She has a passion for promoting healthy work environments and reducing workplace violence for her teams and considers herself a lifelong learner. Again, thank you so much for being here, Kristin. And just to give all you listeners a little extra background about Kristin, I met Kristin when I was speaking at an event that her organization sponsored, and we started talking about disruptive behaviors and found out that Kristin had been in our community for such a long time and was already utilizing some of our strategies, and she was telling me about what she's done in her department, and I was blown away by just her practical, sensible, non-complicated way that she approaches a healthy work environment. So, Kristin, can you tell us a little bit more about your department and maybe what led you down this path into taking action about workplace violence and really taking a look at cultivating a healthy work culture.

Kristin Alives:
As you know, Renee, nursing is hard, healthcare is hard. And it's so hard. It's getting harder. And I really wanted to create an environment for my team, which they felt safe, they felt teamwork. It was fun, they were happy. Together, we've done a lot of work, and I've had people ask me over the last few years and, Kristin, you know, you took one of the floors that was the hardest and had the reputation as being the worst to work on, and now it's one of the best floors, what did you do? And I had a real hard time articulating what exactly I did. I'm not sure because as you said, it was this little tiny thing. When your staff have an environment in which everyone is truly appreciated for their contribution, every member of the team, from the physician, the nurses to housekeeping, every member is truly appreciated for what they contribute each and every day, because we can't do our job if one of those pieces aren't there.

Renee Thompson:
And I think, one of the things that you said, you can't articulate, it's hard to articulate. Is it one thing, two things? What is it? And I think that's the point. Some people even say to me, Okay, give me the top three strategies, or what are two things I can do? And I'm like, I don't know that I could do that. It's not one thing. It's a lot of different things. Although we do have a framework that we use, and we implement that framework. But culture, I always say the culture that you have right now didn't happen overnight, and it's not going to change overnight, and it's not one thing that you do that's going to make a change. It's a lot of different things. It's a lot of little things.

Kristin Alives:
Exactly. I think as the leader, what we need to do is make a focused effort. However it is, we need to focus that effort on the change, addressing incivility. As the leader, that is, you have to address incivility. In order to build trust with your team, they need to know that they can count on you to address bad behavior. In my units, my staff, if they display bad behavior, they know that they're going to be called into my office. And more importantly, I think the staff that witnessed the bad behavior understand that even though they may not know when or where it happened, they trust in me that it will happen. They know those people, whoever had the behavior, I'm going to address it. That ends workplace violence. We have a standardized process here that developed on our unit and is now part of the organization's policy, and how we deal with patients who are being verbally aggressive, physically aggressive, highly manipulative, and I felt that was really important to empower my staff to be able to implement what we refer to as behavioral. Now, I know we've heard the term behavioral plans before and from our psychiatry colleagues. Ours are a little different. And what I think it's important is if something's happening at 8:00 on a Saturday night, my staff aren't waiting for me to come in on Monday morning to do something about that patient, because now they are.

Renee Thompson:
They are empowered to do something on their own.

Kristin Alives:
And they have a standardized process, which I think is a big thing that helped us just in the last couple of years to really move dealing with workplace violence, whether it's the patient or whether it's a visitor.

Renee Thompson:
Yes, 'cause we know that's also on the rise. And even though we consider bullying and incivility under that umbrella of workplace violence, we really focus mostly on bullying and incivility, but we see this patient and family abuse, and it could be verbal abuse, it could be physical abuse, and we know that's on the rise, just like bullying and incivility, colleague-to-colleague, is on the rise. And I'm curious though, you became the manager in this department that did not have a good reputation, and now your department does have a good reputation. And part of it, so one of your strategies was to start addressing bad behavior, because we know right now there are a lot of leaders, they're afraid to confront certain people in their department, especially if they're a new leader, especially if they're a young leader, especially if that employee is extremely competent, during a nursing shortage, because the mindset is, well, a bad nurse is better than no nurse. And I always want to say, No, you know, that's faulty thinking, no. Can you give us any advice? If I'm a brand new leader and I'm dealing with this, and I've now adopted a department that has a bad reputation, can you give us any advice on how you started addressing the disruptive behaviors to the point now? I love this. Everybody knows if you act out, you're going to be in Kristin's office. Okay, Oh, no, you're in trouble. Go to the principal. Okay.

Kristin Alives:
So it's hard when you first start, whether you're a new nurse leader or whether you're new to that organization. In my case, I was new to this organization. And when you first get in there, you want to make everybody like you, and an interesting thing happened. I was here probably about four months, and I was still in that getting-to-know-everybody stage and trying to build relationships with my team. And I had, one of my nurses who, we connected really quickly, we built a strong relationship, like, really quickly, and she looked at me, and I forget what she was upset, but she asked to speak to me in private, took me into the break room, and she looked at me, she goes, What's going on? And I was like, What do you mean? She goes, I really thought you were going to come in here, and I really thought you were going to do something about this. And I looked at her and rushed. She was right, right? I was still in that phase where, you know, just trying to build relationships, that I wasn't addressing the bad stuff. So that's what started it, that kind of what sent me off. And I literally, what I ended up finding good fortune in is the quote, bullies, as we so like to refer to them, in my unit, they had really strong personalities. Now, that could be a really good thing for a nurse leader or a really bad thing to deal with.

Renee Thompson:
Yes.

Kristin Alives:
I like to think of the really strong personalities as opportunities. I'm going to take this strong personality and I'm going to whip it into a leader.

Renee Thompson:
A leader for goodness!

Kristin Alives:
Yes, I'm going to use your behavior for good instead of evil, because what I've found more often than not is the employee that was having a really bad moment and bad behavior, when you're talking to them, it's 'cause they were frustrated over somebody who wasn't doing something the way it's supposed to be done, something that was risking patient safety. So if you have one of those kind of bullies, oh, you're in luck, 'cause rarely all that, and that's how you want to look at it. Not as this obligation that's, Oh, I'm the nurse leader, I have to talk to this employee, and it's going to be awful. Instead, you can look at it as, Wow, I have a wonderful opportunity here to take this really strong personality who obviously has the power to impact those around her or him and turn them into a leader, an informal leader on the floor. And most of the time, I have to tell you, it works. There has only been maybe two cases where I literally had to discipline them out. But other than that,

Renee Thompson:
It's really important.

Kristin Alives:
Really important when you do run into these types of strong personalities, when you see their behavior on the floor has changed, you pull them back in. You pull them back into your office to give them that positive feedback. Hey, I saw you the other day managing whatever, fill in the blank. I want to tell you you did really great job. So they get their positive reinforcement, and then it just builds their confidence for them.

Renee Thompson:
So if you're listening, do you see why I wanted to have this conversation, okay, and have Kristin talk about this? Because, oh my gosh, even myself, when I was a nurse manager and had, I struggled. And so many people know my story about how I had no idea how to address their bad behavior, and very similar to how you started, Kristin, where it was more important for me, for my staff to like me. And because of that, I wasn't addressing their behaviors, but where you had the moment that flipped the switch for you, my moment didn't come until years after I had left that organization. But this is something that leaders mess up, I'll just say it like that. They focus too much on being liked by their team instead of being respected by their team. And to gain the respect, you have to have the courage and willingness to have those tough conversations, and that's a huge piece of it. But what you just described is something that I think will help so many leaders listening, because we see these, Oh my gosh, I have to have a conversation with this person, and you get the surge of hydrochloric acid in your stomach and, you know, lose your peripheral vision for a moment and you dread it. But if you flip your narrative, your mindset, and say, This person has a strong personality, this is an opportunity for me to have them be one of our staunch, like, supporters of a healthy work culture. And I think that is right there, boom, powerful for you to actually create a culture where people know you act up, you're going to be in Kristin's office.

Kristin Alives:
One of the strongest personalities I had when I first started here, three years later, won the most prestigious, sorry, recognition we have.

Renee Thompson:
You're kidding.

Kristin Alives:
Right? I am not kidding. I was so proud of her.

Renee Thompson:
A proud mama, right?

Kristin Alives:
Yeah, I think that's exactly, I felt like a proud mama, and under the umbrella of a healthy work environment. As leaders, we have to give our staff members tools. Just like we need tools to lead, we need to give them tools. So one of the things we have here on West 3 is chatter matters.

Renee Thompson:
That's right, I think you told me about this chatter matters. It's so great.

Kristin Alives:
We had this conversation, huddling with my staff one day, and we were talking about the importance of the mindset you're bringing to work. The chatter that's going on in your own mind could set your day. So if you're driving into work and you're thinking, Oh my God, it's going to be horrible day, or if you're a new grad, and you're thinking, What kind of patient am I going to have? Who am I going to be working with? Am I going to? You're setting yourself up for a bad start at minimum. So we were talking how our internal chatter, so when you hear it, you have to make a conscious effort, right, to change the narrative and come in with a positive internal chatter. And then we started talking about the external chatter, and how my negativity can bring you down. If I'm out on the unit and I'm just complaining about everything and anything, I'm going to bring the people down around me. So we agreed as a unit, we could say to each other nicely, Hey Renee, chatter matters. And that's my nice way of telling you, enough, you're bringing the rest of us down, but not being mean about it. And it's been received really well.

Renee Thompson:
We have a lot of our department's leaders teams that we work with, and that is a, I would say, a common strategy that has worked in all the departments that have adopted this strategy, as you pick a code, word, a phrase, and that is a non-threatening, it doesn't put people on the defense, way of just raising awareness of someone's behavior. And I love this, chatter matters. Hey, chatter matters. Because instead of saying to me, Renee, you're so negative, and you're bringing us down, and you're complaining, and enough is enough, but you say chatter matters. That's like a cue to me. Oh, I need to stop this right now. When you started implementing this, I'm curious if it was adopted immediately or if you had some hiccups along the way.

Kristin Alives:
So when I first started having these talks with myself, I got a lot of eye-rolling. I got a lot of, my office is on the unit at the very end of the hallway, but the hallway is like, so I can hear the whole unit.

Renee Thompson:
It's good and bad.

Kristin Alives:
It's both. It's both. At first, I could hear them saying it to each other. Hey, chatter matters, and they giggle, and they giggle. But then, over the course of time, it just, it caught on. And when people first started using it for real, when they really were saying it to each other, you could see they were a little tentative about it. Someone will just go by, Kristin, chatter matters, and I'll be like, Thank you, because.

Renee Thompson:
I love this for so many reasons. It's simple, it's the team, they come up with. Usually, it could be you as the leader coming up with the word or phrase. It could be the team. Somebody just shared with me that their code word is hippopotamus. And actually, this is the second time I've heard hippopotamus, which it's an unusual word. Okay, some people might take offense to it, just like, you remember the med carts, the computer on wheels, we call them cows. And then people said, No, you can't call them cows because people were offended because they thought you were talking about them? Hey, I'm going to bring my cow in the patient's room, and even patients were offended by it. So something like hippopotamus, I could see potentially somebody might take offense to that. Chatter matters, there's a really great phrase. And people making fun of something like this or mocking it at first, I'm going to tell you right now, is normal. And when I first started doing this work 12 years ago, bullying and incivility, and I would go to an organization I would present, and then I would hear after that, people were making fun of, Oh, you better watch out, you might be a bully, and you might be a bully. I used to get upset like, That's so rude. I can't believe that they're making fun of this. And then I thought, wait a minute. First of all, get over myself. I would rather have someone mocking chatter matters, mocking, Oh, are you a bully? Because people do that when they're uncomfortable. When someone's uncomfortable, that's a coping mechanism. It's to mock. It's to, okay, make fun of. I would rather have someone who starts that way than someone who says nothing. At least the person who's mocking it is engaged. Because somebody who says nothing and maybe just doesn't want to be a part of it is, tends to be disengaged. So I just think, if you're listening right now, this is something so practical, and I would, dare I say, easy to do, where you just start talking about the chatter in your head on your way in, and the chatter in the department, so the internal and external chatter, and what you can do to make that chatter less negative and more positive, because it's really then affecting the entire department. And, you know, Kristin, you and I have talked about what does it mean to have a healthy work environment, and we've talked a little bit about psychological safety, because everything that you're doing, creating an environment where people are willing to speak up and willing to call each other out, Chatter matters, and whatever. That's creating a safe work environment. So can you talk a little bit about that piece of it?

Kristin Alives:
Sure. You just, you have to have an environment of psychological safety within the environment, if you want to have a healthy work environment. Your staff have to feel comfortable and confident, one, in speaking up, whether it's just contributing their thoughts and feelings or whether they're speaking up for safety; they have to feel confident that someone's not going to try to embarrass them or marginalize what they're saying, or even worse, they're not going to feel as though they're going to suffer some repercussions from the leader or from their peers. If they're feeling that way, then you are, A, as the leader, you are not going to get them at their best, yhey are not going to come to you when there's a concern.

Renee Thompson:
And you're not going to know.

Kristin Alives:
And that's going to jeopardize the safety of our patients and the safety of our staff. You have to have psychological safety within you. It really is …

Renee Thompson:
And when you think about what you've been able to create, and we've talked about, it really sounds, the first thing that you really, after you tried to get to know and build a relationship with your team, is that you started addressing disruptive behaviors. And then, from there, it sounds like you're really working on developing your team because you talked about talking to them about the chatter inside your head, your internal and your external. And all of those, I think, create the opportunity for your team to not only learn, because when I read your short bio, it's your lifelong learner. That's great if you're the leader, but what if nobody on your team is a lifelong learner? How do you create that for them too, and just talk to them? Let's talk about what psychological safety means here, and it's the willingness to speak up even if you are uncomfortable. Let's talk about times when you've been in a situation where you weren't sure whether or not you should speak up, but to really cultivate that type of environment, can you give us any strategies or actions that leaders can take to really promote that it is safe, you're in a safe place, and mean it? And, you know, can you give us any strategies?

Kristin Alives:
I think, as we were talking before the start of the podcast, you can't talk about psychological safety without talking about Amy Edmondson. Oh, yes.

Renee Thompson:
Oh, yes, yes. Huge Amy Edmondson fan.

Kristin Alives:
And if you look at the things that she recommends to promote psychological safety, the first thing you want to do is solicit feedback as the leader. So you want to get feedback from your staff, but you have to be vulnerable, right? We have to make ourselves vulnerable because we might not like what we're hearing. And when our staff give us things, feedback that maybe we don't like, it hurts our heart or maybe it hurts our pride, we have to be able to thank them for their feedback. And if it's an adjustment that needs to be made, make that adjustment. Let them see that you've made the adjustment, right? That builds the trust, and it tells them that, I really could say that to Kristin.

Renee Thompson:
Just like your nurse, the nurse who came and told you, Hey, you said, and you didn't.

Kristin Alives:
I'll never forget.

Renee Thompson:
Oh, what a validation.

Kristin Alives:
Yeah, the other thing is, we talk about praise and recognition, but if you see your staff doing things well, going above and beyond, and it doesn't have to be these big, outrageous things, little things. Call it out as you're walking through your department. Call it out. Hey, Renee, I saw that. Nice job. It doesn't have to stop and be this great conversation. You should do that too, but just calling it out. Especially if you see your staff supporting each other, call out that good teamwork every single time you see it. And criticism, you have to provide your staff with criticism if they are not doing it right. We all want to be nice and we want our team to love us and we want them to know we love them, but you still have to lead, and that means you have to let them know when they're not doing it right, where improvements can be made. And you have to, but you have to do it constructive, right? You're not going to go in there and be mean about it. You have to ensure that when you are giving feedback to your team, that they're receiving it in the way that you can.

Kristin Alives:
Your intentions are clear.

Kristin Alives:
And ONO conference recent, and the speaker brought up emoji, and I had never thought of this before, but how right is she that my staff will text me, and I will use an emoji to send it back in my response. And she recommended that you check with your staff to ensure the emojis mean the same thing to them as they do to you. So it's important that as a leader, we make sure that our employees are receiving our feedback, our constructive criticism in the manner in which we intended it. So we have to do that cross-check. We have to check it.

Renee Thompson:
Yeah, I think that's so wise and thoughtful because we think we're communicating and we know what our intentions are, but sometimes on the receiving end, they're not getting it the same way that you think you're delivering it. And there's a way that I like to recommend giving feedback because you're right, you have to respect them enough to give them the constructive criticism that they need so that they can become better, they can improve. I think if you establish this right from the beginning, that, Here's something you're doing really well and be specific about it. Here's something I'd like you to work on and be specific. Like, this is something, it's not saying, it's not a personal attack. It's just, I've noticed this. Maybe it's that, with delegation to your support staff, I've noticed that sometimes it can go one of two ways: that you do everything yourself and you don't want to delegate, you say, Oh, don't worry, I'll get it, but then you get behind, or it can be that you're little condescending to the support staff. Walk out of the room to bring the support staff in to open the container, carton of milk, for your patient, okay, when you were standing right there. True story, I've heard this. So this is something I'd like you to work on. It's better received if you can deliver it in that way. But honestly, I never thought about the emojis. Although my, especially my youngest daughter, she'll, I'll send some emojis, and we love sending GIFs back and forth. You don't even have to have a conversation. Just send one GIF after another GIF. And I think there's something with the heart emojis. Pink means something different than red, and I'm like, oh, for the love of God, I got to figure out now the emoji language. But to your point, if you're sending them to your team, you better make sure everybody knows what they mean.

Kristin Alives:
I had never thought of that. I've definitely checked in with my team, especially if I've given someone constructive criticism. I had a list of things that I will do if I have a huddle. I just did this recently. When it was done, there was, I have, a couple of our employees and one especially, she will tell me exactly how it is. So, you know, I went by and I just whispered, How was that? And she was like, It was good. I'm like, 0 to 10? She was like, 9.5. And we have a very joking relationship. So I was like, 9.5?

Renee Thompson:
Hey, that's a good day.

Kristin Alives:
What about the other five? She's, you're not perfect. Just, you know, you're not perfect.

Renee Thompson:
Oh my God, that is great. When you can be a leader who can kid around and joke with people, but yet, I think what you're saying, Kristin, is, you know, at the end of the day, or bottom line is you want to create a culture where people are having fun, and you can joke around and have great relationships with each other. But if you're acting in a way that's affecting the team in a negative way, oh, we're going to have a conversation about it.

Kristin Alives:
I don't think you can underestimate the power of it. I think as a leader, that should be like one of the top five steps we're requiring you to do. It isn't anywhere, but I think it should be. You should be required to bring the phrase joy back into work. But if you have a team that is having fun together and having fun with you, one of the greatest compliments I got was about a month ago, and I had been on vacation, and when I came back, my team, they're all huddled around looking at something. So I just came up, I was saying hello, blah blah, blah, blah blah. And I didn't know, I can't remember exactly how the conversation went, but one of them just turned around and looked up at me and goes, It's just not as fun when you're not here. I went home, I told my wife, I was like, Oh my God.

Renee Thompson:
Goosebumps, I got goosebumps when you said that.

Kristin Alives:
It's not that fun when you're not here. And I was like, Really? And they were like, Really. And there was like 3 or 4 of them. They all looked up at me, and they were like, Yeah, really. And I was like, That's, that was perfect.

Renee Thompson:
I love that for so many reasons. And actually, this is a great way to sort of wrap up our time together. You really started talking about how hard healthcare is, and it's not easy being a nurse. But if you just take a look at how we just had the conversation about the leader creating opportunities for fun and all the other things that we talked about, addressing bad behavior. Nope, if you act this way, you're going to be in my office, creating an opportunity for psychological safety where people are willing to speak up, and some of the other really great strategies, the chatter matters. I actually think I want to write an article about this. Maybe you and I can co-author an article about Chatter Matters. I think it's just so simple and it is kind of fun. But then to be the leader who recognizes that the work is challenging, but it can still be fun, and to create that environment, which you and I both agree is what we call a healthy work environment. As we wrap up, I usually like to ask our guests what they're reading or if they could, if there's a certain book that you think all leaders should read, it's one of your favorite books, what would that be?

Kristin Alives:
I have a book. Funny story about the book I just started reading. Right now I'm in the middle of reading a book, Stay Interviews. Because we are doing stay interviews. But I asked for a book for Christmas, probably like six-seven years ago and I got it, which, it's Cy Wakeman's No Ego. And I was so excited to get it, and then I started my academic journey and it sat on my shelf for the last six years, maybe seven, and I just started reading that. And what I love about Cy Wakeman is, she really focuses on you doing inner work. Because you really can't have, be this great, impactful leader if you haven't done the inner work. She calls it No Ego, right?

Renee Thompson:
Right. Yeah, that's a great book.

Kristin Alives:
You can get rid of the ego, you can get rid of the drama. So I, that is a book that, I Haven't finished it yet, but I would absolutely recommend, unless you're a new leader. If you are a new leader, one of the books I got as a new leader that I absolutely loved, kind of classic, is Who Moved My Cheese?

Renee Thompson:
Oh, I remember reading that.

Kristin Alives:
Remember that? That is, I've gone back to it, I've gone back to it over the years when I've felt challenged with change and just not read the whole thing, but just flip through the chapters and it really does put things back into perspective.

Renee Thompson:
It does. I read that book. It was given to me when I worked for a managed care company, actually, and I read it and instantly fell in love with it. And I've reread it, it's one of those books that I've reread several times, because you're right. Change is hard. Just like the book, change is hard, you go first. So two great books. I agree, I've read them both. And what we'll do is in the show notes, you'll find links to those books that you can get a copy for yourself. And I'm going to include Kristin's LinkedIn profile, so if you want to connect with Kristin on LinkedIn, we'd encourage you to do that, because she's just been a wonderful guest on the show and just really helping us with some strategies to create, ultimately, that healthy work environment. So, Kristin, thank you for being a guest and for all of your great work to continue creating a healthy and safe work environment for your teams. And thank you for listening and for doing your part to stop the cycle of bullying and incivility in healthcare. Remember, the way we treat each other is just as important as the care we provide. Take care.

Kristin Alives:
Thank you, Renee.

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Things You’ll Learn:
  • As a healthcare leader, it is imperative that one actively addresses and combat incivility to ensure a harmonious and supportive work environment.
  • To establish trust with one’s team, it’s crucial that they feel confident that their leader will address inappropriate behavior when the situation calls for it.
  • While a strong personality in nursing leadership can drive positive change, it may also present challenges.
  • View strong personalities as opportunities to solve problems and create a healthier work environment.
  • To gain respect, leaders must have the courage to have difficult conversations rather than seek popularity.
  • One’s internal thoughts can significantly influence the course of one’s day.
  • Effective communication involves considering how a message is received, not just the intended delivery.
Resources:
  • Connect with and follow Kristin Aviles on LinkedIn.
  • Read Amy Edmondson’s article about creating psychological safety within your team here.
  • Buy Cy Wakeman’s book, No Ego, here.
  • If you’re a new leader, get a copy of Who Moved My Cheese? by Spencer Johnson here.
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